Ohio’s abortion pill law proposed restrictions

An Ohio lawmaker has proposed legislation that would regulate the use of abortion pills.

COLUMBUS, Ohio (WJW/AP) — An Ohio lawmaker has proposed legislation that would regulate the use of abortion pills.

Republican Senator Steve Huffman of Tipp City introduced the bill on Tuesday.

The procedure, approved in the United States, is a 2-pill method available to women in the first 10 weeks of pregnancy.

In February, the Food and Drug Administration lifted a previous requirement that the pills used must be picked up in person.

Huffman said his bill would translate those protections into state law.

His bill would require an in-person examination before using an abortion-inducing drug.

According to a press release, Huffman’s bill would also require:

  • A personal examination before a chemical abortion.
  • Verification that the gestational age is less than 10 weeks.
  • An ultrasound to rule out an ectopic pregnancy.
  • Tests to protect a woman’s future fertility.
  • A medical history review for side effects to an abortion pill.
  • A follow-up visit to check for complications.
  • A government certification program for physicians and distributors of abortion-promoting drugs.

Abortion rights groups said medical abortion is widely available and safe.

The abortion pill is available to women for the first 10 weeks.

More than half of recent abortions in the United States were performed using abortion pills, according to preliminary data released last week.

According to the New York Timesthe report published by the Guttmacher Institute, a research organization that advocates for abortion rights, found that medical abortions accounted for 54 percent of all abortions in 2020.

Comments are closed.