Intimate partner violence and reproductive co

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Of a group of Native American and Alaskan women surveyed, nearly half (45%) said they had experienced reproductive coercion in their lifetime. Intimate partner violence and sexual violence contribute to a disproportionately high prevalence of poor reproductive and sexual health in Native American and Alaskan women, according to a peer-reviewed study Journal of Women’s Health. Click here to read the article now.

The study, co-authored by Elizabeth Miller, MD, PhD, from UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and colleagues, set out to find out how Native American and Alaskan women who have experienced intimate partner violence or sexual violence experienced pregnancy, contraceptive behavior, and reproductive decision-making regarding theirs Describe relationship to violence.

A frequent topic was the lack of conversation about sexuality, healthy sexual development and reproduction. Women were reluctant to go to the doctor for information about birth control, as this was rarely encouraged by their mothers. Health care providers rarely discussed contraception.

The study approach was used “to facilitate understanding of individual factors and sociocultural and historical forces related to the reproductive autonomy and safety of Native American / Alaskan women from violent experiences,” the investigators said. “Input from members of the tribal community highlighted the community assets that could be mobilized to reduce women’s risk of intimate partner violence / sexual violence, reproductive coercion and unwanted pregnancy, and incorporated it into a conceptual model that incorporates culturally appealing violence prevention measures and health promotion. “

“The Violence Disruptor Model that emerged from this work has the potential to mobilize community forces to end violence against Native American and indigenous women in Alaska,” says Journal of Women’s Health Editor-in-chief Susan G. Kornstein, MD, Executive Director of the Virginia Commonwealth University Institute for Women’s Health, Richmond, VA.

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About the magazine
Journal of Women’s Health, Published monthly, is a core multidisciplinary journal devoted to diseases and conditions that are at higher risk for women or are more common in women, and diseases that present themselves differently in women. Run by the editor-in-chief Susan G. Kornstein, MD, Executive Director of the Virginia Commonwealth University Institute for Women’s Health, Richmond, VA, reports to the Journal on the latest advances and clinical applications of new diagnostic procedures and therapeutic protocols for the prevention and management of health problems in women. Full tables of contents and a sample edition can be viewed on the site Journal of Women’s Health Website. Journal of Women’s Health is the official journal of the Society for Women’s Health Research.

About the publisher
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., editor is known for establishing authoritative, peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research. A full list of the company’s 90 magazines, books, and news magazines is available on the website Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., editor Website.


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