The Pill – Is Depo http://isdepo.com/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 23:16:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://isdepo.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/isdepo-150x150.png The Pill – Is Depo http://isdepo.com/ 32 32 Police report 09/22/22 | Warwick Beacon https://isdepo.com/police-report-09-22-22-warwick-beacon/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://isdepo.com/police-report-09-22-22-warwick-beacon/ MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENT At approximately 7:50 p.m. Sunday, September 18, the Warwick Police Department reported a motorcycle accident at the intersection of West Shore Road and Main Avenue. Warwick Police officers arrived at the scene to learn that a male driver was traveling east on Main Avenue in the left lane. The motorcyclist appears to have […]]]>

MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENT

At approximately 7:50 p.m. Sunday, September 18, the Warwick Police Department reported a motorcycle accident at the intersection of West Shore Road and Main Avenue.

Warwick Police officers arrived at the scene to learn that a male driver was traveling east on Main Avenue in the left lane. The motorcyclist appears to have been trying to make a left turn onto West Shore Road when he lost control of the motorcycle, hit the curb and was thrown from the motorcycle, according to a department press release.

The operator was found unconscious and appeared to have sustained serious head injuries, police said.

According to police, who identified him as Keith Burr from Warwick, the driver was not wearing a helmet at the time of the accident.

Burr was taken to Rhode Island Hospital, where he is in serious condition, police said.

The Warwick Police Accident Reconstruction Team responded to the crime scene and is actively investigating. Anyone who witnessed the accident is asked to contact the traffic unit at 401-468-4200.

POSSESSION

At 6:21 a.m. on September 3, Warwick Police Officer Charles M. Walker was at a fixed traffic post on Elmwood Avenue when he observed a white Nissan Maxima sedan “speeding by and possibly looking down at a cell Phone.”

Walker followed the vehicle and ran the license plates, which allegedly went back to a 2003 Ford (not matching the Nissan). Walker initiated a traffic stop near Seasons Corner Market, 2128 Elmwood Ave.

“As I got out of my vehicle, the driver rolled down his windows and put both hands out of the window,” Walker wrote in the arrest report. “As I walked to the vehicle I asked the driver why he had his hands out the window to which he explained it was for safety reasons.”

Walker asked for the driver’s license, registration and proof of insurance. He could not produce a license and said it was suspended.

“When asked about his registration, he stated that his son owns the car and he doesn’t know where the registration papers are and couldn’t find them,” Walker wrote. “When asked if the license plates did not match the vehicle, the driver stated that the car was recently purchased and he fixed the license plates on the vehicle for the time being.”

Police identified the driver as Andrew J. Gould, 48, of 14 Middle St., West Warwick.

Gould produced a bill of sale for the car, but it was dated July.

Police confirmed that this would be Gould’s third arrest for driving while his license was suspended, a misdemeanor.

Additional Warwick Police units arrived at the scene and Gould was asked to get out of the vehicle.

Police searched Gould and reportedly found an unlabeled bottle of pills.

“I asked Andrew what was in the pill bottle and he said it should be crushed with a straw,” Walker wrote. “When I opened the bottle of pills, I noticed that there were two bags of white powder and a piece of straw that I had cut off.”

Police say they also found a blue pill (possibly Adderall) loose in Gould’s pocket, and the driver had no proof of prescription. Police continued the search and then allegedly found “a plethora of yellow pills (7) loose in his pocket.” Police identified the pills as diazepam.

“Both pills and the white powder are considered controlled substances and I advised Andrew that he would also be charged with possession of a controlled substance,” Walker wrote.

A search of a motor vehicle allegedly found two prescription bottles of methadone in a locker, according to police.

Gould was arrested and charged with possession of a Schedule IV controlled substance (10 grams or less) and driving with a suspended driver’s license (third offense, misdemeanor).

“BCI tested and weighed the white powder and confirmed that there is a trace amount of fentanyl weighing 2.5 grams,” Walker wrote.

Gould also received a subpoena for improper use of the registry or certificate of ownership.

DUI

At approximately 10:51 p.m. on August 21, Warwick Police Officer Jake R. Reddy responded to the Masthead Drive area after a motor vehicle accident was reported with no injuries.

Upon arrival, he approached one of the drivers, later identified as Michelle Botelho, 23, of 117 Setian Way, West Warwick.

“As soon as I spoke to Botelho, I could smell an alcoholic beverage coming from her mouth,” Reddy wrote in the arrest report. “I observed that her eyes were bloodshot and watery.”

“I had to ask Botelho several times to explain the sequence of events leading up to the collision of the two vehicles and she was unable to give me a meaningful explanation,” Reddy wrote.

Botelho reportedly told police that she had “four drinks on her boat,” according to the arrest report.

She agreed to a series of standardized on-site sobriety tests. Upon completion of the tests, Botelho was arrested and taken back to Warwick Police Headquarters. She was charged with DUI of Liquor (BAC unknown, first offense) and received a subpoena for refusing to submit to a chemical test (first offense). She was discharged from the station to a sober adult.

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iPhone 14 Pro: What Dynamic Island does and how to use it https://isdepo.com/iphone-14-pro-what-dynamic-island-does-and-how-to-use-it/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 22:28:01 +0000 https://isdepo.com/iphone-14-pro-what-dynamic-island-does-and-how-to-use-it/ When the iPhone 14 Pro models were announced, Apple surprised many with its innovative integration of software features with the pill-shaped cutout at the top of the screen it calls “Dynamic Island.” This article explains what it does, how it works, and how you can interact with it to perform actions. What is Dynamic Island […]]]>

When the iPhone 14 Pro models were announced, Apple surprised many with its innovative integration of software features with the pill-shaped cutout at the top of the screen it calls “Dynamic Island.” This article explains what it does, how it works, and how you can interact with it to perform actions.

What is Dynamic Island and how does it work?

At the start of the rumor cycle leading up to the “iPhone 14 Pro” announcement, we learned that Apple was working on one Alternative to the notch which included a pill shaped cutout and a hole punch cutout to accommodate the TrueDepth camera hardware.

As recently as late August, a week after Apple’s iPhone event invites were sent out, we exclusively reported that when using the “iPhone 14 Pro,” these snippets would appear as a coherent, longer pill shape, and that Apple also planned to release software integrate functions around the pill.

iphone 14 pro blue image
As we now know, on the “iPhone 14 Pro” models, display pixels merge around what Apple calls the “dynamic island” into a pill-shaped area that changes size and shape to accommodate different types of alerts, notifications, and interactions, and it turns into a kind of front-and-center information hub.

Which iPhone models have Dynamic Island?

The dynamic island is limited to the “iPhone 14 Pro” and the “iPhone 14 Pro” Max. The standard iPhone 14 models continue to offer the same notch as the iPhone 13 models.

What can Dynamic Island do?

Here’s a breakdown of the many functions Dynamic Island can fulfill.
iPhone 14 Pro Dynamic Island 3

Dynamic Island: View expenses and alerts

  • Apple Pay transaction confirmations
  • Privacy indicators when using microphone or camera
  • AirDrop file transfers
  • AirPods connection status and battery life
  • ‌iPhone‌ charge level and battery life
  • Low battery warnings
  • Silent mode on or off
  • Face ID Unlock
  • Carkey lock/unlock
  • Unlock Apple Watch
  • NFC Interactions
  • AirPlay connections
  • The focus mode changes
  • Shortcut Actions
  • Airplane mode/no data alerts
  • SIM card alerts
  • connect accessories
  • Find my notifications

Dynamic Island: Background Activities

  • Upcoming and turn-by-turn map directions
  • Incoming call and call duration
  • Remaining time to play the song
  • Active timers
  • Live activity sports scores
  • SharePlay Sessions
  • screen capture
  • Voice memo recordings
  • Personal hotspot connection

Can I interact with Dynamic Island?

It is possible to interact with certain types of content displayed on the dynamic island. For example, if you’re seeing something related to an app’s background activity, you can tap the dynamic island to go directly to the associated app.

Under certain circumstances, e.g. B. when media is playing, you can also long press on the dynamic island to bring up a widget with playback controls.

dynamic island allocation
The dynamic island can also display multiple background activities at the same time, e.g. B. when a timer counts down and when you listen to music. When that happens, the island splits into a larger pill-shaped area and a smaller circular area, allowing you to see and interact with both activities. You can switch between them and tap into them just like you can with Dynamic Island’s standard interface.

Final Thoughts

Overall, the dynamic island on iPhone 14 Pro models is the kind of impressive integration of software and hardware Apple is known for, and the ability of third-party developers to realize its potential means we can expect new and unexpected features from that.

ephemeral digital island for iPhone 14
Additionally, with the release of iOS 16.1 later in 2022, Dynamic Island will also work with Live Activities in third-party apps, so there’s much more to look forward to.

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DEA warns parents, schools to watch out for ‘rainbow fentanyl’ that looks like candy https://isdepo.com/dea-warns-parents-schools-to-watch-out-for-rainbow-fentanyl-that-looks-like-candy/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 00:03:09 +0000 https://isdepo.com/dea-warns-parents-schools-to-watch-out-for-rainbow-fentanyl-that-looks-like-candy/ WASHINGTON- The Drug Enforcement Administration has issued an alert about a new “rainbow fentanyl” that looks like candy and has been found in 18 states. The trend, according to the DEA, “appears to be a new method used by drug cartels to sell highly addictive and potentially deadly fentanyl that looks like candy to children […]]]>

WASHINGTON- The Drug Enforcement Administration has issued an alert about a new “rainbow fentanyl” that looks like candy and has been found in 18 states.

The trend, according to the DEA, “appears to be a new method used by drug cartels to sell highly addictive and potentially deadly fentanyl that looks like candy to children and teenagers.”

The DEA did not respond to a request for the identity of the 18 states.

Lt. Rio Rancho Police Department spokeswoman Jacquelynn Reedy said the department had not seen rainbow fentanyl in Rio Rancho.

However, she noted that “fentanyl is a problem in Rio Rancho and in the state of New Mexico.”

In August, the Sandoval County Sheriff’s Office intercepted shipments of 22,000 fentanyl pills and 4 pounds of meth. About 8,000 fentanyl pills were ready to hit the streets in Sandoval County, officials said. Laura Whittenburger of Rio Rancho was arrested and taken into custody.

The Albuquerque Police Department also has not responded to a request for information about whether the rainbow fentanyl was found in Albuquerque.

But illegal drugs are nothing new in New Mexico.

On September 2, multiple police departments and federal agencies in Albuquerque were involved in a massive $5 million drug bust involving fentanyl and heroin. The source of the drugs is said to have been the Sinaloa cartel.

According to a story in the Albuquerque Journal, the pills believed to be intended for distribution in New Mexico totaled more than 1 million. About 142 pounds of methamphetamine were also seized, along with two hand grenades, ballistic vests, a bulletproof baseball cap, 37 firearms and thousands of rounds of ammunition.

Five people were arrested, including an alleged member of the Sureños gang, whose crew reportedly sold thousands of fentanyl pills each week in Albuquerque, according to a 104-page affidavit from FBI case agent Bryan Acee.

And according to a May 2022 report by the New Mexico Department of Health and Human Services, the state had the 11th-highest drug overdose rate in the United States in 2020, and two in three overdose deaths were associated with opioids, such as prescription opioids, heroin, or fentanyl.

In 2020, the report said the fentanyl-related death rate was seven times that of 2016.

“Rainbow Fentanyl — fentanyl pills and powder that come in a variety of bright colors, shapes and sizes — is a deliberate attempt by drug dealers to promote addiction in children and young adults,” DEA Administrator Anne Milgran said in an explanation. “The men and women of the DEA are working tirelessly to stop the Rainbow Fentanyl trade and take down the Mexican drug cartels that are responsible for most of the fentanyl trafficked in the United States.”

Colorful fentanyl is being confiscated in several forms, including pills, powder and blocks that resemble sidewalk chalk. Despite claims that certain colors may be stronger than others, there is no indication in DEA’s lab tests that this is the case. Any color, shape, and size of fentanyl should be considered extremely dangerous, according to the press release.

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that is 50 times more potent than heroin and 100 times more potent than morphine. Already two milligrams of fentanyl, which corresponds to 10-15 grains of table salt, is considered a lethal dose. Without lab testing, there is no way of knowing how much fentanyl is concentrated in a pill or powder.

Fentanyl remains this country’s deadliest drug threat, the DEA said.

According to the CDC, 107,622 Americans died from drug overdoses in 2021, with 66 percent of those deaths attributable to synthetic opioids like fentanyl. Drug poisoning is the leading cause of death among Americans between the ages of 18 and 45. Fentanyl available in the United States is primarily supplied by two criminal drug networks, the Sinaloa Cartel and the Jalisco New Generation Cartel (CJNG).

In September 2021, DEA launched the A pill can kill the public awareness campaign Educate Americans about the dangers of counterfeit pills. Visit DEAs for additional resources for parents and the community Fentanyl Awareness Side.

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How Jagged Little Pill clarified Jo’s gender identity https://isdepo.com/how-jagged-little-pill-clarified-jos-gender-identity/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 13:00:55 +0000 https://isdepo.com/how-jagged-little-pill-clarified-jos-gender-identity/ “Jagged Little Pill” was never meant to come across lightly. The jukebox musical was meant to reflect its namesake: Alanis Morissette’s 1995 multi-Grammy winning album, which she launched as a beacon of unabashed honesty and unwavering conviction, especially when singing about difficult subjects. Likewise, the stage show focused on a family facing hot issues including […]]]>

“Jagged Little Pill” was never meant to come across lightly. The jukebox musical was meant to reflect its namesake: Alanis Morissette’s 1995 multi-Grammy winning album, which she launched as a beacon of unabashed honesty and unwavering conviction, especially when singing about difficult subjects. Likewise, the stage show focused on a family facing hot issues including sexual misconduct, substance abuse, mental health and white privilege.

The Broadway production addressed some of these issues more successfully than others. For this was praised his nuanced portrayals of opiate addiction, sexual assault, and viewer interference but received criticism for it Abuse of the teenage character Jo. A pre-Broadway version had numerous lines signaling Jo as gender nonconforming – a rarity for a Broadway musical – but many of those lines were removed when the musical opened on Broadway in late 2019. The production — as well as Lauren Patten, the cisgender woman who created the role — later publicly stated that Jo was never written or conceived as non-binary.

“Rather than offering a non-binary narrative that would offer representation and validation to a particular group of people (who are desperate for such representation and validation on stage), ‘Jagged Little Pill’ instead opts for cheap universalization.” wrote Christian Lewis for the Brooklyn Rail. “They did Jo cis … to make the character more relatable.”

Last year the producers gave a lengthy statement Apologies for the lack of transparency and accountability regarding Jo’s character. “We should have protected and celebrated the fact that non-binary viewers saw in Jo a brave, defiant, complex and vibrant representation of their community,” the statement said. “We are committed to clarity and integrity in telling Jo’s story. The story of a gender non-conforming teenager who finds himself on an open-ended journey in terms of his queerness and gender identity.”

During the pandemic shutdowns, the musical’s creatives made numerous changes on and offstage for its brief Broadway reopening run, as well as its North American tour – currently at the Pantages Theater in Hollywood through October 2 – and a UK production slated for 2023.

“We take on the challenge of making a show that is committed to tackling issues that aren’t easy,” says director Diane Paulus. “I’m grateful for the opportunity to continue learning to be rigorous in what we present to the world and to prioritize the health and well-being of our cast members as they delve into a storyline that can be taxing, especially when it overlaps.” with their lived experiences. It’s not about ticking boxes; It’s about approaching the piece with more intention to make it safer, more inclusive and better than before.”

Some key lines in the remastered version of Jagged Little Pill bring new weight to Jo’s gender identity journey. While the Broadway version flattened its arc to a disdain for overtly feminine dress, the tour deepens its exploration through a brief conversation with its conservative parent. “You’re only going to make life harder for yourself! Trust me – it’s hard enough as it is,” Jo tells her mother. And a breakup scene has a new sting: Just before she performs the standout song “You Oughta Know,” Jo laments to her friend Frankie, “I thought you were the only person that saw me.”

Book author Diablo Cody modified these scenes, along with others that more specifically address Frankie’s transracial adoption, with the help of playwright MJ Kaufman, poet and professor Lauren Whitehead, and playwright Martine Kei Green-Rogers – a dramaturgical team representing nonbinary, transgender and BIPOC -Stand-in.

“We decided that if we consciously choose to do a show that’s multi-topic and super well-intentioned, we simply have to make sure it remains an accurate reflection of the lived experiences of the people whose.” Stories that we try to tell,” says Cody. “It’s exhausting, but also luxurious – the ultimate privilege to still be able to play with the clay.”

Although Jo uses she/her pronouns throughout production, “the ultimate conclusion of Jo’s gender identity is not certain at the moment the show ends,” says producer Arvind Ethan David. “But we absolutely welcome people to take with them from this journey whatever they need to take with them, and we’re sorry if we ever suggested that you shouldn’t.” Any suggestion we had previously made about who Jo is or isn’t just wasn’t helpful.”

The producers also emphasize that the role of Jo is open to performers of all gender identities going forward. “We’re not being explicit, we’re just asking that you see yourself somewhere within the spectrum of this role,” says producer Eva Price of casting the revamped Jo. “Is this someone who is gender nonconforming, gender questioning, or gender biased? Is this someone who is trans or non-binary? We deliberately left it open.”

Heidi Blickenstaff and the cast of Jagged Little Pill.

(Matthew Murphy)

The tour will play the role of Jade McLeod, a St. Clair College graduate who grew up outside of Toronto and identifies as non-binary. “I knew right away that Jo didn’t fit into any category and I felt so deeply connected to it,” they say. “This was the first time I’ve seen someone like me perform on stage, so it’s quite an honor to be able to expand on that and bring my own joy in my own gender experience.

“On tour of this show, there may be a good portion of our audience that has never in their life seen a non-binary person that they know, let alone laughed, cried, and had a crush on,” they continue . “After a preview in Kentucky, a woman stopped me and said, ‘My kid is just like you, and now I understand.’ I love that when our audience is able to open their hearts and connect with these characters in this shared experience, it impacts how they see people and the world.”

The production has struggled to provide more support for the cast and creative team members, especially given the show’s subject matter and previous complaints. In the past year, Actors’ Equity Assn. commissioned an independent review from the “Jagged Little Pill” job after non-binary former cast member Nora Schell told her had been intimidated into postponing medical treatment during the Broadway run.

Although the investigation, which concluded in January, “found no evidence that the Equity-stage management team pressured any members while they were ill or injured,” says an Equity representative, “the investigator also found that production could have better ensured a safe workplace a variety of ways aligned with industry best practices.”

An actor jumps over a couch towards another actor;  a third actor is kneeling behind the couch.

Heidi Blickenstaff, left, Allison Shepard and Jena VanElslander in Jagged Little Pill.

(Matthew Murphy)

Post-shutdown rehearsals began with a workshop by DEI sensitivity consultant Skyler Cooper, who created space for conversations e.g. B. on how to speak responsibly about the issues raised in the show or what logistical or pastoral care is required to safely fulfill these roles. “I’ve been in this business for 25 years and I’ve never had sensitivity training like this,” says lead actress Heidi Blickenstaff, who plays the matriarch of the family. “I asked questions that were difficult for me to ask because it is very new to discuss these things in a forum like this. But the environment feels incredibly safe to me.”

In addition, the show hired a staff representative and instituted a formal grievance reporting process. “For a hundred years, American theater has not established any of these types of infrastructures for its company members; That’s just not how they created and built shows,” says producer Price.

“But theater works with human capital, so for our ‘product’ to be good the people doing the work have to be in their best place. And the people who come to our place every night need to feel like they’re part of something that’s a good way to spend their money and time that night.

“Ignoring all of that reality and just going on as usual, like it was five or ten years ago, isn’t going to do any show any good, let alone a show like ours,” she continues. “How can we go on stage every night with these stories about caring for people who are going through things like this and then not do everything we can to protect and help those within the company who are also going through things like this.” go through? If we want to talk, we have to walk the path.”

‘Jiggle Little Pill’

Where: Hollywood Pantages Theater, 6233 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles

When: 8pm Tuesday to Friday, 2pm and 8pm Saturday, 1pm and 6.30pm Sunday. Ends October 2nd

Tickets: Starting at $39

Contact: (800) 982-2787 or BroadwayInHollywood.com or Ticketmaster.com

Duration: 2 hours, 40 minutes, with one break

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China biotech has to swallow a bitter US pill https://isdepo.com/china-biotech-has-to-swallow-a-bitter-us-pill/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 05:12:00 +0000 https://isdepo.com/china-biotech-has-to-swallow-a-bitter-us-pill/ U.S. President Joe Biden coughs during a signing ceremony for the CHIPS and Science Act of 2022 on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S. August 9, 2022. REUTERS/Evelyn Hockstein Sign up now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com to register HONG KONG, Sept 14 (Reuters Breakingviews) – China biotech’s American honeymoon […]]]>

U.S. President Joe Biden coughs during a signing ceremony for the CHIPS and Science Act of 2022 on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S. August 9, 2022. REUTERS/Evelyn Hockstein

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HONG KONG, Sept 14 (Reuters Breakingviews) – China biotech’s American honeymoon is coming to an end. Cross-border mergers in the industry have experienced a boom despite intensification geopolitical tensions, but US President Joe Biden wants to reduce dependence on foreign manufacturers. While domestic capacity building will take years, a form of decoupling is now underway.

Modeled on John F. Kennedy’s “Moonshot” speech urging Americans to lead space exploration, Biden’s supreme command signed a “cancer moonshot” on Monday, urging local drugmakers to pioneer new treatments. The key to his initiative is to ensure that “biotechnologies invented in the United States of America are made in the United States of America”. According to White House data, over 70% of drug ingredient manufacturing sites registered with the US Food and Drug Administration are located outside of the country; 13% in the People’s Republic.

Investors promptly sold major Chinese stocks, including Hong Kong-listed WuXi Biologics (2269.HK), which fell 20%, or $7 billion in market value, in a single day. China’s top drug contract manufacturer, now valued at $28 billion, has benefited from offering manufacturing, research and development and other services to companies like Johnson & Johnson (JNJ.N), often at far lower costs than in the United States. American customers accounted for 54% of WuXi’s sales in the first half this year, up from 44% two years ago.

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The router looks a bit premature. Building local manufacturing and other infrastructure will take years. Biden hasn’t provided details yet, but analysts at Jefferies believe the replacement of Chinese manufacturing will come at a one-time cost of up to $18 billion for U.S. drugmakers, as well as additional labor costs of $12 billion per year would lead.

Still, the US biotech initiative could gain momentum as geopolitical tensions flare. Much like Washington’s $30 billion push to bolster domestic chip manufacturing, outsourcing drug manufacturing would create jobs, reduce supply chain risks and strategically keep Chinese competition at bay. With the right government incentives and subsidies, demand for WuXi’s services could gradually diminish over time.

Even after yesterday’s sell-off, shares of WuXi are trading at 33 times one-year forward forecast earnings, well above 28 times that of Swiss rival Lonza (LONN.S). With more bad news out of Washington, Chinese biotech companies have a bitter pill to swallow.

consequences @ywchen1 on twitter

CONTEXT NEWS

US President Joe Biden signed a new executive order on Sept. 12 to channel an unspecified amount of money into US research into bio-derived technologies, boost domestic bio-manufacturing and reduce reliance on foreign companies. The order “directs the federal government to ensure that biotechnology invented in the United States is manufactured in the United States,” Biden said.

Hong Kong shares of WuXi Biologics, a Chinese drug contract manufacturer, closed up 20% to HK$53.40 on September 13.

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Edited by Robyn Mak and Thomas Shum

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

The opinions expressed are those of the author. They do not reflect the views of Reuters News, which is committed to integrity, independence and freedom from bias under the Trust Principles.

The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

]]> Gotta Run: How exercise makes us better in life and at work! – Mail from Salisbury https://isdepo.com/gotta-run-how-exercise-makes-us-better-in-life-and-at-work-mail-from-salisbury/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 04:09:05 +0000 https://isdepo.com/gotta-run-how-exercise-makes-us-better-in-life-and-at-work-mail-from-salisbury/ Gotta Run: How exercise makes us better in life and at work! Published Saturday 10 September 2022 00:00 One of my favorite things to do is collect excuses that others use to avoid exercising. Can you guess what the most common excuse I hear is? “But I don’t have time!” wins by far. I recently […]]]>

Gotta Run: How exercise makes us better in life and at work!

Published Saturday 10 September 2022 00:00

One of my favorite things to do is collect excuses that others use to avoid exercising. Can you guess what the most common excuse I hear is? “But I don’t have time!” wins by far. I recently came across a book by Brad Stulberg called The Practice of Groundedness. Stulberg found some interesting thoughts on why we all need to incorporate movement into our lives. Below are some highlights.

A 2019 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says Americans actually have time. The study surveyed a diverse sample of 32,000 Americans about how they spend their time. The results weren’t surprising, given that Americans spend more than 4.5 hours a day on their free time, most of it in front of screens. This result was consistent across income, age, gender, and ethnicity.

However, many say they have important and intense jobs and are just too tired to exercise. Stulberg says we should be doing exercise to a large extent, rather than avoiding exercise because of her work. You’ve heard me say it, and research proves that regular physical activity boosts creative thinking and problem-solving, improves mood and emotional control, improves focus and energy, and promotes a good night’s sleep. What kind of work wouldn’t benefit from all of these things?

And here’s one that’s really close to my heart! Stanford University conducted a study that asked participants to complete mentally tiring tasks. After that, one group took a break and these participants stared at a wall. Another group continued on foot for up to 15 minutes during their break. Both groups were then tested for creative insight, with the walking group testing 40% more than those who stared at the wall. This concept works for children and young people when they are physically active. The Daily Mile program in our elementary schools has proven time and time again that after their 20 minute break, children are more focused and creative to run or walk their mile.

Most regular athletes believe that exercise improves their brain function. Stulberg says exercise boosts long-term brain development by triggering the release of a chemical called brain-derived neutrophic factor (BDNF), a type of brain fertilizer. BNDF drives a process called neurogenesis, which creates new brain cells and creates connections between them. I’m reading more and more about the connection between physical activity and regular exercise and how it prevents and delays cognitive decline. Stulberg says: “To date, there is no better prevention for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s than regular physical activity.”

A key point of the book is one I’ve heard before that cites the idea that if exercise could be bottled and sold in pill form, it would be a trillion-dollar blockbuster drug. The pill would be used for everything from enhancing performance to improving well-being to preventing and treating disease.

Stulberg said: “Once we start looking at physical activity as an essential part of performing better at work, we’ll be more likely to make it a regular part of our lives. This shift in mindset provides both permission and motivation to spend time moving our bodies, making exercise less self-serving and more essential.”

Most of us don’t think of exercise as part of our job, but sometimes we think of it as work. But by bringing movement into our lives and committing to it, we get better at work too. Happier, healthier and more comfortable in both places!

Finally, another study was conducted on how to get this exercise. After something as simple as a 30-minute walk or six five-minute walks throughout the day, mood and energy remained high. Overall job satisfaction was highest when exercise was spread out throughout the day.

Look for Spencer’s Run to the River 5K and other upcoming events at www.salisburyrowanrunners.org.

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BrightInsight adds medical device and biopharmaceutical experts Tamara Elias, MD and Scott Huennekens to the Advisory Board https://isdepo.com/brightinsight-adds-medical-device-and-biopharmaceutical-experts-tamara-elias-md-and-scott-huennekens-to-the-advisory-board/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 12:33:09 +0000 https://isdepo.com/brightinsight-adds-medical-device-and-biopharmaceutical-experts-tamara-elias-md-and-scott-huennekens-to-the-advisory-board/ SAN JOSE, California — BrightInsight, Inc., Provider of the leading global platform for biopharmaceutical and medical device-regulated digital health solutions, today announced the appointment of Tamara Elias, MD, Senior Vice President at Nuance and Scott Hunnekens, CEO of Hyperfine, Wondr Medical, Acutus Medical and Envista Holdings Corporation, to the BrightInsight Advisory Council. dr Elias and […]]]>

SAN JOSE, California —

BrightInsight, Inc., Provider of the leading global platform for biopharmaceutical and medical device-regulated digital health solutions, today announced the appointment of Tamara Elias, MD, Senior Vice President at Nuance and Scott Hunnekens, CEO of Hyperfine, Wondr Medical, Acutus Medical and Envista Holdings Corporation, to the BrightInsight Advisory Council. dr Elias and Huennekens bring deep and complementary experiences to this group of industry professionals who will work with BrightInsight leadership to advance the company’s vision of improving patient outcomes worldwide through the power of digital technology.

dr Elias and Huennekens join the advisory board as BrightInsight further solidifies its position as the de facto digital health platform for biopharma and medtech. A new biopharma partnership for BrightInsight was announced in the first half of 2022, with Sanofi adding to its client list that includes CSL Behring, Roche, Novo Nordisk, and others. The company also recently launched BrightInsight Networked diagnostic platform for in vitro diagnostics and their digital Disease Management Solution.

“We are very pleased that Dr. Tamara Elias and Scott Huennekens join our Advisory Board and provide insights based on their decades of leadership in digital innovation and adoption in the life sciences,” said Kal Patel, MD, CEO and co-founder of BrightInsight. “Our team and customers will benefit from their advice as we continue to grow internationally and expand our portfolio of digital health solutions.”

Tamara Elias, MD, has been deeply involved in healthcare for over 20 years and brings a wide range of diverse experiences from medical school through residency training, followed by strategic healthcare consulting, private equity investing, corporate strategy and business development and product innovation, including board positions. Currently, as Senior Vice President, Strategy and Business Incubation at Nuance Communications, a Microsoft company, she orchestrates complex processes and initiatives to understand how the unique assets of these two companies can be leveraged to drive workflows and diagnostics across the ecosystem to improve healthcare. In her previous role at Merck, she was Vice President of Global Partnerships & Innovation and implemented “all around the pill” innovations for her stakeholders. Prior to Merck, she was vice president of clinical product development at Aetna and vice president, strategy and business development at Becton Dickinson. Earlier in her career, she was a partner at Essex Woodlands Health Partners, McKinsey executive and general surgeon. She currently serves on the boards of directors of Avinger (NASDAQ:AVGR), REVA Medical LLC and BehaVR.

“Digital touches every area of ​​healthcare, including biopharma, that traditionally lacks expertise in regulated platforms,” ​​said Tamara Elias, MD. I look forward to joining the BrightInsight Advisory Council and working with the team to advance the adoption of digital technologies in the life sciences industry.”

Scott is a veteran medtech CEO, chairman, board member, entrepreneur, and investor who has served in one of these roles for more than 20 startup, growth, and public companies with aggregate market valuations in excess of $20 billion. He is currently executive chairman of Hyperfine (NASDAQ: HYPR), chairman of Acutus Medical (NASDAQ: AFIB), chairman of Envista (NYSE: NVST), board member of Nuvasive (NASDAQ: NUVA), and executive chairman and investor of Wondr Medical. Over 20 million patients have benefited from the therapies and diagnostics of the companies in which Scott has been a part.

“As the medtech industry advances, everything revolves around digitization, with the guiding principle being connectivity, which enables data to be collected and enabled,” said Scott Huennekens. “It is important for medical technology to share data across the continuum of care to foster collaboration, enable better care and reduce costs. Achieving these goals requires a regulated digital health platform to ensure medtech and diagnostics companies comply with quality, security, regulatory, and privacy requirements. I’m excited to join the BrightInsight Advisory Council and work with the team to continue to improve and customize their offerings for innovative medtech companies.”

BrightInsight and its customers completed seven Software as a Medical Device (SaMD) projects in 2021. The company is expanding its footprint around the world with team members in the United States, Europe and India.

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The BrightInsight Advisory Board includes some of the world’s most accomplished thought leaders in healthcare, technology and business including Mark T. Bertolini, Karl Hick, Donald Jones, Jeffrey Leiden, MD, Ph.D., Diana McKenzie, Kim Powell, Brent Saunders, Meinhard F. Schmidt , Jagjot (JJ) Singh, Bradley Stock, Hemant Taneja and Elisabethann Wright.

BrightInsight provides the leading global platform for biopharma and medical device regulated digital health solutions. When speed matters, we help companies accelerate time to market for regulated digital health offerings across therapeutic areas including apps, healthcare provider interfaces, analytics dashboards, algorithms, medical devices, connected combination products, diagnostics and software as a medical device (SaMD) . BrightInsight replaces the need for lengthy and complex “build from scratch” implementations by offering configurable software solutions and a proven platform built on Google Cloud under a quality management system to support global security, privacy and regulatory requirements. When creating digital health products on the BrightInsight platform, compliance is future-proof as intended use changes across different regions.

For more information, see BrightInsight website, to blog, Twitterand LinkedIn Pages.

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Should climbers take oral contraceptives? https://isdepo.com/should-climbers-take-oral-contraceptives/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 20:16:38 +0000 https://isdepo.com/should-climbers-take-oral-contraceptives/ “], “filter”: { “nextExceptions”: “img, blockquote, div”, “nextContainsExceptions”: “img, blockquote”} }”> Get full access to Outside Learn, our online learning center with in-depth fitness, nutrition and adventure courses and 2,000+ instructional videos when you sign up for Outside+ >”,”name”:”in-content-cta”,” type “:”link”}}”>Sign up for Outside+ today. Let’s get down to business: For many girls and women, […]]]>

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Get full access to Outside Learn, our online learning center with in-depth fitness, nutrition and adventure courses and 2,000+ instructional videos when you sign up for Outside+ >”,”name”:”in-content-cta”,” type “:”link”}}”>Sign up for Outside+ today.

Let’s get down to business: For many girls and women, working out or performing on their period sucks.

Menstruation can affect your weight, mood and performance. When symptoms appear on game day, they are usually undesirable. Many female athletes have used hormonal birth control pills for decades to alleviate these symptoms and even avoid otherwise unfortunate timing. Contraceptives can relieve cramps, regulate and lighten periods, and even clear skin.

But the introduction of foreign hormones into the body can be troubling for a variety of reasons. For an athlete, the effects of estrogen go well beyond developing breasts and regulating a monthly cycle. Estrogen can affect overall performance by affecting recovery, injury rates, and strength.

Looking for information on whether estrogen supplementation is good or bad for athletes Climbers in the gym interviewed Keith Baar, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology and Behavior at UC Davis and renowned expert on tendon health. Baar has published 168 articles with a total of nearly 8,000 citations over the course of his career. One of his studies, published in early 2019 in limits in physiology, went straight to the role of hormonal contraception and athletic development.

in the Effect of estrogen on musculoskeletal performance and risk of injury, Baar and Nkechinyere Chidi-Ogbolu, a Ph.D. Student at UC Davis, discussed the role estrogen plays in muscle, tendon and ligament development and thus in athletic development and performance. The simple answer: It’s complicated.

estrogen and muscle

Based on animal and human studies of aging, estrogen is decidedly beneficial for building muscle mass and strength. For example at one Study 2016 published in Journal of Endocrinology, Ovariectomized rats showed a 10 percent decrease in strength and an 18 percent decrease in muscle fiber cross-sectional area (the cross-sectional area of ​​muscle fibers is proportional to the force a muscle can generate) after just 24 weeks. Similar studies (for example one published in the Journal of Applied Physiology) have also shown an increase in injured muscle fibers in ovariectomized rats. When ovariectomized rats were supplemented with estradiol, a form of estrogen, their muscle fiber cross-sectional area and recovery rate normalized. In other words, a lack of estrogen resulted in muscle loss and strength, while restoring estrogen levels (via supplementation similar to oral contraception) returned muscle area and strength to previous levels.

Postmenopausal women, who have lower estrogen levels after a missed period, have been shown to lose muscle at a much faster rate than their male counterparts. in one Study 2012 Published in The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, Postmenopausal women received estrogen replacement therapy to raise their estrogen levels to those of premenopausal women and the result was a normalized anabolic or muscle building response. In other words, giving postmenopausal women estrogen helped them build muscle at the same rate as their younger, premenopausal counterparts.

in the another study Published in clinical science, 80 postmenopausal women were assigned to one of four groups: exercise, hormone replacement therapy, exercise and hormone replacement therapy, or no treatment, all followed for one year. The group that did both exercise and hormone replacement therapy saw the greatest increase (7.1 percent) in muscle cross-sectional area and a 17.2 percent increase in vertical jump (the highest point reached by a standing jump). The hormone replacement group saw similar, albeit smaller, increases in muscle area (6.3 percent) and vertical jump (6.8 percent). Notably, exercise alone was less effective than hormone replacement therapy alone at preserving muscle mass.

Birth control pills contain synthetic forms of the naturally occurring hormones estrogen and progesterone. While estrogen can increase the anabolic (muscle building) response, it’s also clear that progesterone has a negative impact. A Study 2011 published in Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in SportsScientists compared formulations of oral contraceptives and found that a contraceptive high in progesterone, in contrast, inhibited muscle protein synthesis. Athletes who choose oral contraception should choose high-estrogen, low-progesterone contraceptives.

Given that estrogen helps athletes build muscle, what are the practical implications? Think of a woman’s natural estrogen cycle as a series of highs and lows. Insert the pill and the line flattens out – fewer highs and the lows only occur during menstruation. This flattening tends to negatively impact healthy women trying to build muscle because it reduces physiologically high estrogen spikes. It follows that healthy women trying to build muscle should not take hormonal birth control pills as it will inhibit their ability to do so.

estrogen and ligaments

However, estrogen also affects tendons and ligaments, complicating the simple conclusion that hormonal birth control is bad for athletes. Estrogen has been shown to loosen the ligaments. That partly explains why women are two to eight times more likely tearing their ACLs than their male counterparts. Lax ligaments mean loose joints that can expose athletes to serious injury.

Rahr-Wagner and his colleagues found that women who had never used oral contraceptives had a 20 percent greater relative risk of ACL injury than long-term users. Because women’s estrogen levels are highest during the pre-ovulatory and ovulatory phases of their cycle, female athletes who do not use oral contraceptives are at greater risk at these times than those who do, and thus may need to exercise more caution in training routines these phases.

So oral contraceptives are bad for building muscle but good for protecting the ligaments by keeping the joints tighter.

estrogen and tendons

While studies suggest that estrogen loosens ligaments, estrogen has a similar effect on tendons that can be both good and bad. A stiff tendon will pull the muscle faster, allowing the athlete to achieve better peak performance. A stiff tendon is also more likely to pull or tear a muscle.

Due to naturally occurring estrogen spikes, women’s tendons are generally looser than men’s, and as a result, women suffer fewer muscle injuries, strains, and groin and thigh strains. Women also have a lower risk of Achilles tendon ruptures – that is, until menopause. Likewise A Study 2015 published in European Journal of Applied Physiologyshowed that oral contraceptives (ie, women with no estrogen levels) were associated with greater muscle damage and soreness, and a Study 2006Published in Foot and Ankle International, showed an increased risk of Achilles tendinitis when using oral contraceptives.

It follows that oral contraceptive users may be able to generate higher peak force than their peers, but they will also have less recovery time and be at greater risk of muscle and tendon damage.

The formula

So what is a woman supposed to do?

Baar and Chidi-Ogbolu summarized it in this strategy: According to their recommendation, a woman in a training and off-season phase is better off avoiding oral contraceptives because the body’s high levels of estrogen generally allow athletes to build muscle to recover quickly and to be less prone to tendinopathy. However, when an athlete is in game season, taking oral contraceptives can be beneficial. Lower estrogen levels can increase strength as the tendons become stiffer. The athlete may not need to recover as quickly as they would normally like as they are likely to have more time between comps or send gos. She also may not need to build muscle—just maintain it. The oral contraceptives can also help protect their ligaments from injury during competition.

But to add to the complexity, every woman is different and responds differently to oral contraceptives. This formula is a good place to start, but it’s not a formula for everyone. Climbers must experiment with their own formulas and training programs under the guidance of their healthcare professionals to find what works best for them.

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The NHS is reviewing a £19,000-a-year pill recommended by Khloe Kardashian that stops migraines in their tracks https://isdepo.com/the-nhs-is-reviewing-a-19000-a-year-pill-recommended-by-khloe-kardashian-that-stops-migraines-in-their-tracks/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 21:09:42 +0000 https://isdepo.com/the-nhs-is-reviewing-a-19000-a-year-pill-recommended-by-khloe-kardashian-that-stops-migraines-in-their-tracks/ The NHS is reviewing a £19,000-a-year pill recommended by Khloe Kardashian that stops migraines in their tracks The Rimegepant pill is available in the US, where it costs patients £19,000 a year Health watchdog NICE is considering approving the new drug for use in the spring Experts say the drug is more convenient than the […]]]>

The NHS is reviewing a £19,000-a-year pill recommended by Khloe Kardashian that stops migraines in their tracks

  • The Rimegepant pill is available in the US, where it costs patients £19,000 a year
  • Health watchdog NICE is considering approving the new drug for use in the spring
  • Experts say the drug is more convenient than the current self-injection regimen

Millions of NHS patients suffering from debilitating migraine attacks could soon benefit from a pill that prevents them before they have a chance to strike.

The pill, taken every other day, could be approved for use next spring, according to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE).

Experts say it’s far more convenient than the current gold standard treatment of monthly self-injections.

The pill, called Rimegepant, blocks activation of a protein in the brain that is known to trigger migraine attacks. Studies show it can cut the frequency of moderate to severe headaches in half. It is also effective in relieving migraines when taken minutes after it begins.

The pill, taken every other day, could be approved for use next spring, according to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE).

The drug is called Rimegepant and is endorsed by Khloe Kardashian.  It costs American patients £19,000 a year but experts predict the drug's maker, Biohaven Pharmaceuticals, will give the NHS a hefty discount

The drug is called Rimegepant and is endorsed by Khloe Kardashian. It costs American patients £19,000 a year but experts predict the drug’s maker – Biohaven Pharmaceuticals – will give the NHS a hefty discount

The drug – recommended by reality star and migraine sufferer Khloe Kardashian – is approved in the EU. The UK regulator, the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), gave the go-ahead for use back in July.

Insiders have told The Mail on Sunday that the drug will be available to patients at private UK clinics this month. NICE will decide by March whether it is cost effective for use by the NHS.

The pill is estimated to cost patients £19,000 a year in the US, but experts predict the drug’s maker – Biohaven Pharmaceuticals – will give the NHS a hefty discount.

dr Brendan Davies, consultant neurologist at North Midlands NHS Trust University Hospitals in Stoke, described the drug as life-changing. He says: “Migraines are an underestimated condition that has historically been difficult to treat. The impact on people’s lives can be debilitating. Some lose their jobs because they are forced to stay in bed several days a week.

“But Rimegepant adds another useful option that will be especially welcome for those suffering from needle phobia.”

Around 10 million people in the UK suffer from migraines – throbbing headaches on one side of the head. Attacks can include a variety of symptoms, such as: B. Sensitivity to light, nausea and seeing flashing lights. They are thought to be triggered by nerves and blood vessels at the front of the brain releasing excessive amounts of a protein called calcitonin gene-related peptide, or CGRP. This is responsible for the transmission of vital signals between the brain cells.

Current migraine treatments include over-the-counter pain relievers and pills — triptans — that help interrupt pain signals. While these can relieve symptoms once migraines set in, they cannot prevent them.

They also cause drowsiness and further headaches if taken too often and cannot be used by people with a history of strokes and heart attacks.

Most migraine prevention treatments were developed for other conditions and often come with serious side effects. These include beta blockers and antidepressants, both of which also cause drowsiness.

In the past two years, health chiefs have approved several other CGRP-inhibiting drugs — erenumab, galcanezumab, and fremanezumab — to be taken as monthly injections. These vaccinations prevent migraines and relieve the symptoms. They also have fewer side effects than previous options, with only about two percent of patients reporting nausea.

While rimegepant will be the first CGRP inhibitor tablet to be made available in the UK, experts have raised concerns about whether patients will be able to access it.

Last July, The Mail on Sunday revealed that thousands of migraine sufferers were being denied vaccinations.

Activists blamed in part the strict criteria patients must meet to qualify, including failing three medications and suffering from migraines at least 15 days a month.

“We are concerned that anti-CGRPs are still not reaching those who need them through the NHS,” says Dan Tickle of the National Migraine Centre. “There are many patients who have to wait months to get them. Patients should not be afraid to request vaccinations from their GP or contact the National Migraine Center.’

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