Pregnancy Prevention – Is Depo http://isdepo.com/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 07:09:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://isdepo.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/isdepo-150x150.png Pregnancy Prevention – Is Depo http://isdepo.com/ 32 32 Wissot: Parental control extends only to your children https://isdepo.com/wissot-parental-control-extends-only-to-your-children/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 22:07:55 +0000 https://isdepo.com/wissot-parental-control-extends-only-to-your-children/ School bells are ringing, are you listening? But since mid-August they are no longer allowed to be. The children in reading, writing and arithmetic were accompanied by parents on a crusade Remove books from school library shelves they consider age inappropriate and “harmful” for minors. Parents’ efforts are paying off. A recent report by PEN […]]]>


School bells are ringing, are you listening? But since mid-August they are no longer allowed to be. The children in reading, writing and arithmetic were accompanied by parents on a crusade Remove books from school library shelves they consider age inappropriate and “harmful” for minors.

Parents’ efforts are paying off. A recent report by PEN America, an organization dedicated to protecting free speech “found that from July 2021 through the end of March this year, more than 1,500 books were banned in 86 school districts in 26 states.”

The report raised suspicions as to whether age inappropriateness was the sole reason for the vendetta against so many books. Content inappropriateness also seems to have been a factor. Forty-one percent of the banned books involved characters of color; 22% addressed racism; 33% contained LGBTQ themes. What kind of society have we become, where one parent decides what books another parent’s children read?



Banning LGBTQ books is very fashionable now. 1933 also book burnings in Nazi Germany, which dealt with “deviant sexuality”. The first book burning after the Nazis came to power took place at the Institute for Sexology. The institute’s library housed a collection of 20,000 books on intersex, homosexual and transgender people.

Helen Keller’s books were also burned because, according to the Nazis, stories about a disabled woman were not what the children of a master race should read. In an open letter to German students the day before their books were burned, Keller warned, “History has taught you nothing if you think you can kill ideas.”



It’s not just books being removed from library shelves. Posters in a classroom at an elementary school in Pensacola, Florida, with pictures of Martin Luther King Jr., Harriet Tubman, Colin Powell and George Washington Carver were removed because school officials deemed them “age inappropriate.” It kind of makes you wonder how old you have to be to see a wall full of pictures of inspiring African American role models. Since Florida was part of the Confederacy during the Civil War, it also causes you to speculate whether images of Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee, and Stonewall Jackson would have been treated similarly.

I believe parents have every right to direct their own children’s reading habits, but to reiterate, only for their own children. Most Americans do not advocate book censorship. In Michigan, for example, where the Dearborn Public Schools “pulled” seven books off library shelves because, as one school president said, “an evaluation of the books in our inventory,” 78.48% of Michigan residents oppose any book bans in school libraries.

At the heart of this controversy is the desire of some parents to protect their own children from reading books about racism, sexual orientation, transgender identity and post-adolescent sexuality. Like climate change deniers and election deniers, these parents exemplify contemporary denialism, a denial of inconvenient truths and indisputable facts.



The good news is that there are cures for what’s bothering these deniers. There’s homeschooling, religious education, private tutoring. Parents who don’t want their children to read about racial discrimination and contraception shouldn’t send them to public schools. Eleven percent of US households homeschool their children. The biggest downside I can see to homeschooling is that prom sucks.

I am for giving parents an irrevocable right to have their children blithely follow them down the path that leads to willful ignorance. I am not in favor of giving them the power to encourage willful ignorance of other parents’ children.

You don’t have to have children in public schools to take a stand against the actions of those parents. I’ve lived in Denver for 41 years and 50% of my property taxes go to Denver Public Schools each year. I am vehemently opposed to my tax dollars being used to support the medieval mentality of parents whose views on book censorship closely align with the Taliban.

In a pluralistic, democratic society based on majority rule, the dissenting minority always has the right to refuse participation in what they find objectionable. Don’t like a particular book in the school library? Then don’t let your child read it. Don’t like the sexualized content in movies? Then don’t let your child watch. Do you prefer a whitewashed, mythologized version of American history to one based on factual evidence? Then send your child to a school that teaches history as mythology. Do you think abortion is abhorrent? Then don’t get any and make sure your child doesn’t get any.

However, do not violate the rights of people like me who don’t mind living in a secular society with all its seedy, seedy, dirty and lewd temptations. I’ll tell you a little secret. I’ve never gone to an adult bookstore, looked at porn online, or gone to a strip club. You may think that I am sexually repressed and you are right. I would just add that it’s none of your business. It’s between me and my therapist, Dr. Ruth.

Excuse the digression, the point is that I have no desire to prevent other people from enjoying pleasures that I do not find enjoyable. Live and let live. That’s what the Amish and Mennonites do. You must be looking at our contemporary version of Sodom and Gomorrah with absolute horror. To their credit, they never show up at book ban rallies.

Let’s act more like the Amish and the Mennonites.

Jay Wissot lives in Denver and Vail. Email him at jayhwissot@mac.com.

]]>
Ebola Virus What is Ebola Virus Diseases Symptoms Treatment Prevention https://isdepo.com/ebola-virus-what-is-ebola-virus-diseases-symptoms-treatment-prevention/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 06:47:36 +0000 https://isdepo.com/ebola-virus-what-is-ebola-virus-diseases-symptoms-treatment-prevention/ New Delhi: Uganda’s health authorities on Tuesday confirmed an outbreak of the Ebola virus after testing samples from a 24-year-old man in central Uganda’s Mubende district, who later succumbed to the disease. Earlier this month, the National Rapid Response Team investigated six other suspicious deaths that occurred in the same district and eight suspected cases […]]]>

New Delhi: Uganda’s health authorities on Tuesday confirmed an outbreak of the Ebola virus after testing samples from a 24-year-old man in central Uganda’s Mubende district, who later succumbed to the disease. Earlier this month, the National Rapid Response Team investigated six other suspicious deaths that occurred in the same district and eight suspected cases at a health care facility for treatment.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), it is a rare Sudan Ebola virus, the last outbreak was reported in 2012.

What is Ebola virus?

According to the WHO, the Ebola virus was first discovered in 1976. Flying foxes from the Pteropodidae family are considered natural hosts of the virus. The Ebola virus belongs to a family of Filovirida viruses within which six species have been identified – Zaire, Bundibugyo, Sudan, Taï Forest, Reston and Bombal.

ALSO READ: US: 48 people charged with running $250 million Covid fraud scheme

Transmission of Ebola virus disease (EVD).

Blood, secretions, organs or other body fluids from infected animals such as flying foxes, chimpanzees, porcupines, etc. found sick or dead in the rainforest are likely to transmit the virus to humans. Similarly, human-to-human contact is likely to spread through the blood or bodily fluids of a person who has contracted or died from Ebola. Items contaminated with bodily fluids (such as blood, feces, vomit) from a person who is infected or has died from the virus can spread EVD.

Pregnant women who have recovered from acute EVD can still carry the virus in breast milk and other pregnancy-related fluids and tissues, also posing a risk to their baby. However, anyone who becomes pregnant after surviving an Ebola infection is not at risk of carrying the virus.

People remain contagious as long as their blood contains the virus.

Symptoms of EVD

Symptoms can appear anywhere from 2 to 21 days and can come on suddenly. A person cannot spread the virus until they develop symptoms. Initially, symptoms appear as – fever, fatigue, sore throat, muscle aches and headaches. Followed by more severe symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, rash, and impaired kidney or liver function. In certain cases, patients may have both internal and external bleeding, such as: B. Weeping gums, low white blood cell and platelet counts and increased liver enzymes.

treatment and vaccine

The WHO reported that two monoclonal antibodies (Inmazeb and Ebanga) were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in late 2020 for the treatment of Zairean ebolavirus (Ebolavirus) infection in adults and children. Apart from that, supportive measures such as rehydration with oral ingestion or intravenous fluids and treatment of specific symptoms are used. Blood products, immunotherapies and drug therapies are currently being evaluated.

Prevention of Ebola virus disease

To avoid large outbreaks, several steps must be taken. Those who handle patients must follow a procedure, including in labs, surveillance and contact tracing are a must alongside safe burials. Other prevention tips from the WHO include:

  • Animal products (meat) should be thoroughly cooked before consumption. Raw meat should not be eaten. Animals should be handled with gloves and other appropriate protective clothing.
  • When caring for an infected patient, gloves and appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) should be worn during care. Direct contact with an infected person and body fluids must be avoided. Washing hands after caring for a patient or visiting a hospital is recommended.
  • Health monitoring for Ebola-related symptoms should be performed by a person who has been in contact with an infected person for at least 21 days.
  • A risk of transmission through sex is possible, WHO recommends male survivors of EVD safe sex and hygiene for 12 months from the onset of symptoms or until their semen has tested negative twice for the Ebola virus.
  • Survivors of acute Ebola virus should be tested for the virus in breast milk before breastfeeding. Pregnant women should be encouraged to attend frequent prenatal care (ANC) visits to manage any pregnancy complications.

Check out health tools below-
Calculate your body mass index (BMI)

Calculate Age by Age Calculator

]]>
Four out of five pregnancy-related deaths in the US are preventable https://isdepo.com/four-out-of-five-pregnancy-related-deaths-in-the-us-are-preventable/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 14:22:00 +0000 https://isdepo.com/four-out-of-five-pregnancy-related-deaths-in-the-us-are-preventable/ More than 80% of pregnancy-related deaths were preventable, according to 2017-2019 data from the Maternal Mortality Review Committees (MMRCs), which are representatives from diverse clinical and non-clinical backgrounds who review the circumstances surrounding pregnancy-related deaths to make recommendations about future ones prevent deaths. Information from MMRCs in 36 US states on the leading causes of […]]]>

More than 80% of pregnancy-related deaths were preventable, according to 2017-2019 data from the Maternal Mortality Review Committees (MMRCs), which are representatives from diverse clinical and non-clinical backgrounds who review the circumstances surrounding pregnancy-related deaths to make recommendations about future ones prevent deaths. Information from MMRCs in 36 US states on the leading causes of death by race and ethnicity can be used to prioritize actions that can save lives and reduce health disparities.

“The report paints a much clearer picture of pregnancy-related deaths in this country,” said Wanda Barfield, MD, MPH, director of the CDC Division of Reproductive Health at the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. “The majority of pregnancy-related deaths were preventable, underscoring the need for quality improvement initiatives in states, hospitals and communities that ensure all pregnant or postpartum people receive the right care at the right time.”

Main results:

Of the pregnancy-related deaths with timing information, 22% of deaths occurred during pregnancy, 25% on the day of delivery or within 7 days thereafter, and 53% between 7 days and 1 year after pregnancy.

The leading causes of pregnancy-related deaths include:

  • Mental illness (including suicide and drug overdose/poisoning related deaths) (23%)
  • Excessive bleeding (hemorrhage) (14%)
  • Heart and coronary diseases (related to the heart) (13%)
  • infection (9%)
  • Thrombotic embolism (a type of blood clot) (9%)
  • Cardiomyopathy (a disease of the heart muscle) (9%)
  • Hypertensive pregnancy disorders (related to high blood pressure) (7%)

The most common underlying cause of death varied by race and ethnicity. Heart and heart disease were the leading underlying cause of pregnancy-related deaths among non-Hispanic Black people, mental illness was the leading underlying cause for Hispanic and non-Hispanic White people, and bleeding was the leading underlying cause for non-Hispanic Asian individuals.

Highlighted dates of American Indians or Alaskan Natives

Native Americans or Alaskan Natives (AI/AN) are disproportionately affected by pregnancy-related deaths. A second report uses an approach to classifying AI/AN populations that also includes those who also identify as multiracial or Hispanic.

Based on a review of pregnancy-related deaths in AI/AN individuals, mental illness and bleeding were the most common underlying causes of death, accounting for 50% of deaths with a known underlying cause. Most pregnancy-related deaths among AI/AN individuals (93%) were classified as preventable. About 64% of deaths occurred between 7 days and 1 year after pregnancy.

Everyone can help prevent pregnancy-related deaths

More than half (53%) of pregnancy-related deaths occur within a year of delivery. It is critical for all healthcare professionals to ask if their patient is pregnant or has been pregnant in the last year in order to make diagnostic and treatment decisions. Health systems, communities, families and other support systems need to be aware of the serious pregnancy-related complications that can arise during and after pregnancy. Hear the concerns of people who are pregnant and have been pregnant in the last year and help them get the care they need.

Examples of prevention recommendations from MMRCs include broader access to insurance coverage to improve initiation of prenatal care and post-pregnancy follow-up, opportunities to avoid barriers to transport to care, and the need for referral and coordination systems.

Maternal mortality review commissions are the best source for prevention strategies

MMRCs are multidisciplinary committees that meet at the state or local level to comprehensively review deaths during or within a year of pregnancy. Their goal is to understand the circumstances of each death and develop recommendations for action to prevent deaths in the future.

This is the first information to be released as part of Enhancing Reviews and Surveillance to Eliminate Maternal Mortality, a CDC-funded program to support agencies and organizations that administer MMRCs. CDC also supports the Maternal Mortality Review Information Application (MMRIA) to standardize the reporting of data from MMRCs. This report reflects the efforts made by jurisdictions to improve their MMRC processes and use MMRIA to document and disseminate information.

Recently, CDC significantly increased its investment in efforts to eliminate preventable pregnancy-related deaths, with new grants totaling $2.8 million to support additional MMRCs in nine jurisdictions. CDC now supports MMRCs in 39 states and one US territory. Building this important infrastructure will help better understand and prevent pregnancy-related deaths in the United States

Additional information:

State Strategies for Preventing Pregnancy-Related Deaths: A Guide for MMRC Data to Action provides MMRCs and their partners with guidance to facilitate the implementation of data-driven strategies to prevent pregnancy-related deaths.

/CDC publication. This material from the original organization/author(s) may be post-date in nature and may be edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author(s). full view here.

]]>
back pain in women after 40; Experts on surprising causes and prevention tips | Health https://isdepo.com/back-pain-in-women-after-40-experts-on-surprising-causes-and-prevention-tips-health/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 10:08:09 +0000 https://isdepo.com/back-pain-in-women-after-40-experts-on-surprising-causes-and-prevention-tips-health/ As you approach age 40, your chances of recurrent, annoying back pain may increase. Your likelihood of experiencing lower or upper back pain will increase with each passing year given that spinal wear and tear accelerates with age. Back pain is more common in women than in men for a variety of reasons. We asked […]]]>

As you approach age 40, your chances of recurrent, annoying back pain may increase. Your likelihood of experiencing lower or upper back pain will increase with each passing year given that spinal wear and tear accelerates with age. Back pain is more common in women than in men for a variety of reasons. We asked a gynecologist and a physical therapist about the reasons why women over 40 are more prone to back pain than men of the same age.


It’s not that younger women don’t experience back pain. The causes of back pain in young women can be muscle or ligament strains, incorrect movements or a jerk, herniated or degenerated disc herniation, or sciatica. Then there are gynecologic causes of back pain like premenstrual syndrome, endometriosis, dysmenorrhea (painful periods), and pregnancy, says Dr. Shweta Shah, Full Time Consultant – OBGY, Cloudnine Group of Hospitals, Mumbai, Malad.

During pregnancy, the spine undergoes a change called exaggerated lumbar lordosis which, along with hormonal changes and increased weight on the spine, leads to back pain when the muscles aren’t strong enough.

CAUSES OF BACK PAIN IN WOMEN OVER 40

LATE PREGNANCY


Late pregnancy may increase the likelihood of back pain in a woman (SHVETS production)


Pragnya Ravichandran Executive Physiotherapist Cloudnine Group of Hospitals T. Nagar-Chenna says back pain is more common in women who become pregnant in their fourth decade of life.

“When pregnant in the fourth decade of life, a woman must cope with the effects of her aging body and the physical changes in her musculoskeletal system that pregnancy brings. Poor physical activity and a higher BMI during the period leading up to conception can increase the risk of back pain in women who become pregnant in their 40s,” says the physiotherapist.

OSTEOPOROSIS


Women over 40 are at risk of osteoporosis (Shutterstock)


dr Shah says women in their 40s are more likely to develop osteoporosis and osteopenia, which could be an indirect reason for back pain. “Additionally, women in this age group experience perimenopause due to reduced estrogen levels, which impacts their bone health. The reasons for back pain are spondylolisthesis, degenerative discs, spinal canal stenosis and degeneration of the spine and body, which is an aging process,” says the gynecologist.

OBESITY


obesity


dr Shah believes obesity is another important cause of back pain, especially if the BMI is over 30.

“Women should take active measures to maintain a healthy spine and back by adopting a healthy lifestyle. They should take care of their healthy posture and keep their spine straight. It is advisable to consult a doctor to check during exercise Taking vitamin D and calcium supplements regularly,” says Dr. shah

MENOPAUSE


Menopause ((Getty Images/iStockphoto))


Aging is an inevitable change that happens to every human being. Women go through many physiological changes during each decade of their lives before they even reach this aging process. And these physiological changes are controlled by the hormones that prepare them to give birth to a child. “By the time women hit their mid-40s, they may be in perimenopause, and a drop in estrogen levels can cause various physical changes in her, mostly affecting the musculoskeletal system,” says Ravichandran.

SEDATED LIFESTYLE


Avoid a sedentary lifestyle to prevent back pain (Unsplash)


Low back and pelvic pain is a common problem that every woman in her mid-40s experiences.

“Risk factors include sedentary lifestyles and sedentary lifestyles, poor dietary habits, overweight and obesity, metabolic diseases, poor bone mineral density due to hormonal changes, psychological stress, changes in circadian rhythms affecting sleep patterns, vitamin D deficiency, bone degeneration, muscle atrophy, and sarcopenia Changes due to aging, etc.,” says Ravichandran.

TIPS FOR PREVENTING AND TREATMENT OF BACK PAIN IN WOMEN OVER 40


Exercise is important to maintain strength and agility (Elina Fairytale)


– Exercise plays a key role in controlling these factors. Any type of exercise such as aerobic training, strength and endurance training, flexibility, balance and coordination training goes a long way to managing these risk factors and preventing back pain. Recent research has shown a lower risk of back pain in women who exercise at least 3 to 5 days a week, consisting of moderate-intensity exercise.

– Women should pay attention to their posture and keep their spine straight.

– It is advisable to consult a doctor if you are taking vitamin D and calcium supplements while exercising regularly.

– Doctors recommend that overweight women make serious efforts to lose weight and maintain a normal weight.

“Women should seek appropriate counseling and diagnosis if they have had back pain for more than 2 to 3 weeks. Accurate diagnosis of back pain is essential, whether it is acute or chronic, specific or non-specific, is very important for proper treatment and the best possible recovery,” concludes Dr. Shah.


Follow more stories on Facebook & Twitter

]]>
When should you get your 2022 flu shot? https://isdepo.com/when-should-you-get-your-2022-flu-shot/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 23:37:26 +0000 https://isdepo.com/when-should-you-get-your-2022-flu-shot/ Even as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to claim lives across the country, the flu remains a potentially serious threat to your health. Jump directly to: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that between 2010 and 2020, the flu caused 140,000 to 710,000 hospitalizations and 12,000 to 52,000 deaths annually. But the organization says […]]]>

Even as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to claim lives across the country, the flu remains a potentially serious threat to your health.

Jump directly to:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that between 2010 and 2020, the flu caused 140,000 to 710,000 hospitalizations and 12,000 to 52,000 deaths annually. But the organization says so During the 2020-2021 flu season, only about half of adults got a flu shot.

A flu shot can prevent you from getting the flu, which is a stressful, uncomfortable experience even if your symptoms aren’t severe. And when you do If you get the flu, getting the flu shot can also save you from getting sick enough to need a hospital (and exposing yourself to all the COVID risks that hospital environments can bring).

According to the CDC, the flu vaccine also offers other potential health effects, such as: lower rates of certain cardiac events for people with heart disease. It is also the best and safest way not only to protect yourself against the influenza virus, but also to minimize the chance that you’ll spread it to others — people who could be at far greater risk of serious complications or even death if they were to become infected. Read more from the CDC about what the flu shot can do for you.

And read on to find out if you should get the flu shot now and where to find free or inexpensive flu shot options near you.

Is this flu season going to be bad?

It’s true that 2020 saw a record number of flu cases – most likely due to widespread mask wearing, increased hygiene, social distancing and remote work and school.

Last year’s flu season also “didn’t rise as much as people expected,” said UCSF medical professor Dr. Peter Chin-Hong — but “it dragged on a lot longer.” While a typical flu season peaks in February, Chin-Hong said last year’s “lasted from October 2021 to June 2022 — a much longer tail than we did.” would normally expect”.

So what about the flu risks this winter? Chin-Hong said he and other medics are “concerned for several reasons.”

Along with the lifting of COVID restrictions, there is the fact that Australia has just had its worst flu season in five years. Because the continent’s winter occurs during the United States’ summer, Australia’s flu season has traditionally been an indicator of how bad ours could be — and worryingly, it was as “robust as any of the pre-pandemic flu seasons,” Chin said – Hong Kong.

Should I get the flu shot now or wait?

Medical professionals’ recommendations on when to get a flu shot are based on the fact that it takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to form and provide protection against the flu.

This flu season, the CDC says September and October are “generally good times to get the flu shot,” and that “Ideally, everyone should be vaccinated by the end of October.”

It takes two weeks after your flu shot for your body to make the antibodies it needs to protect you from the flu virus. (Queen’s University/Flickr)

Yes, there is evidence of that, says Chin-Hong Your risk of getting the flu increases every month after your flu shot because antibodies wane over time.

But when medical professionals talk about strategically “waiting” for a flu shot, they direct this advice to those who are at particularly high risk for more serious flu-related complications. This includes people over 65, people with chronic medical conditions, people who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, and children under the age of 5.

Delaying vaccinations for these populations is based on the idea of ​​getting the vaccination at what Chin-Hong calls “the ideal point,” around mid to late October. Two weeks later, around early November, the antibodies should have developed just as flu season is getting serious. Consider it the “biggest bang for your buck,” he said.

So if you belong to one of these vulnerable categories? Yes, you can think about waiting, says Chin-Hong. People over 65 might also consider requesting the special flu vaccines for that age group – read more about this below. As with all health matters, when seeking advice the best way is to consult your doctor or someone you see regularly for your medical needs.

And what if you’re under 65, not pregnant, and don’t have other risk factors for severe flu? If you’re really confident about planning ahead and not forgetting to make the appointment, “it’s probably best to get it before the end of October,” Chin-Hong said. But remember, you’re not just human and it might slip your mind, but predictions about how the flu season might play out are just that – predictions. The timing of this year’s flu season may surprise us and confound previous notions of a “best time” to mess up the vaccine.

“Just as we can’t predict the next COVID surge, we don’t know if influenza will have a different pattern this year,” Chin-Hong said, noting that Australia’s particularly bad flu season started earlier than expected. So take this “October Rule” with “a grain of salt,” he advised, and “get it [your flu shot] when you get it.”

What if you want to get vaccinated in October with the best of intentions but still forget? If November 1st comes and goes and you realize you haven’t been vaccinated, all is not lost — as the CDC says that “getting vaccinated after October can still provide protection during the peak of flu season,” which is usually the February is.

In other words, just get the recording – whenever that may be.

Can I get my COVID booster and flu shot at the same time?

Yes you can. Ashish Jha, the White House COVID response coordinator, went so far as to tell the audience in a Sept. 6 briefing:I really believe that’s why God gave us two arms – one for the flu shot and the other for the COVID shot.

This “COVID shot” is the newly available COVID booster – that is the new Moderna and Pfizer boosters of the reformulated COVID-19 vaccine. The updated vaccinations, dubbed bivalent vaccines, target both the original strain of coronavirus and the widespread Omicron subvariants BA.4/BA.5, which have largely evaded previous boosters.

Anyone aged 12 and over who received their last COVID shot at least two months ago – whether it is the first series of shots or the last booster shot – can now get an updated COVID booster shot. Read more about finding an updated COVID booster near you.

The CDC confirms it’s safe to get the flu shot and the bivalent COVID booster at the same time “if you are eligible and the timing matches.” Several pharmacy chains are urging those who make an online appointment for a bivalent COVID booster to “add” a flu shot at the same time.

Taking both shots at the same time is certainly convenient, Chin-Hong said, “It’s all one-stop and again: out of sight, out of mind.”

The only thing potentially stopping you from getting your bivalent COVID booster and your flu shot: If you want to get your booster as soon as possible, some experts believe you may be It might be a bit early to get the flu shot now, considering how immunity to the vaccine is waning. That’s what other doctors say the benefits of people remembering, actually receive Both her booster shot and her flu shot probably outweigh the conseven if it means the timing of her flu vaccine is a little early.

Chin-Hong reiterated, “If you really wanted to optimize the timing of your flu shot, yes, sometime in October is probably the best.” But ultimately, that’s just what he’s saying to get the shots is better than not getting them at all.

If I have risk factors for severe flu, what type of flu shot should I get?

If you’re 65 or older, this flu season has something new for you to know: There are now three types of flu vaccines that are recommended for you because they’re even more effective for you than a regular flu shot.

Chin-Hong said people in this age group should seek out these three types of vaccines because what you’re getting is “essentially a high-dose vaccine,” or a vaccine that contains an “adjuvant” — which, simply put, “makes the flu vaccine stronger in terms of that.” Wake up the immune system,” he said. Read more about the three types of flu shots available to people aged 65 and over.

Pregnant women can get regular flu shots, although there are some types of flu vaccines that are off-limits to pregnant women. The CDC says getting vaccinated during pregnancy not only helps protect you from the flu, but — if your baby is born during the immunity phase — it also protects your child for the first few months of life when they are too young to give birth to get vaccinated yourself.

This benefit for the baby is also why pregnant women are one of the few groups that might consider getting the flu shot earlyrather than waiting – to make sure her baby isn’t left completely unprotected for the first six months after birth, when she can’t get a vaccine. Read more about the benefits of getting the flu shot when you’re pregnant.

Children as young as 6 months can have a regular dose of the flu shot. The flu can be particularly dangerous for childrenand the CDC says a 2022 study showed that flu shots reduced children’s risk of severe, life-threatening flu by 75%.

Where can I get the flu shot if I have insurance?

If you have health insurance, a flu shot is available at no extra cost as a preventative service from your usual healthcare provider or most pharmacies (see below).

It’s a good idea to wear a mask, maintain social distancing wherever possible while waiting for your shot, and change into a top with sleeves that you can easily pull up to your shoulder to make the injection even easier (and quicker). make.

Common places to find a flu shot appointment, walk-in location, or drive-through flu shot:

Where can I get the flu shot if I Not have health insurance?

If you want to get the flu shot but don’t have health insurance, you can get the vaccine for free from several providers and community clinics in the Bay Area. (Technically, you can use these free services even if you have insurance, but you may consider releasing these special resources to those who don’t have insurance.)

Your county health department may also offer flu shots.

Places to get a free or low-cost flu shot in the Bay Area include:

]]>
West Virginia legislature agrees to ban abortion with few exceptions https://isdepo.com/west-virginia-legislature-agrees-to-ban-abortion-with-few-exceptions/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 21:40:02 +0000 https://isdepo.com/west-virginia-legislature-agrees-to-ban-abortion-with-few-exceptions/ CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — The West Virginia legislature on Tuesday passed a blanket abortion ban with few exceptions, approving a bill that several members of the Republican supermajority said they hope will make it impossible for the state’s only abortion clinic to continue operating them to offer the procedure. “It’s going to close this abortion […]]]>

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — The West Virginia legislature on Tuesday passed a blanket abortion ban with few exceptions, approving a bill that several members of the Republican supermajority said they hope will make it impossible for the state’s only abortion clinic to continue operating them to offer the procedure.

“It’s going to close this abortion clinic, I’m sure of it,” Republican Senator Robert Karnes said in the Senate to shouts from protesters who were outside the chamber doors. “I think it will save a lot of babies.”

Under the legislation, rape and incest victims could have abortions up to eight weeks pregnant, but only if they first report to law enforcement. Such victims, who are minors, would have up to 14 weeks to terminate a pregnancy and would have to report to either law enforcement or a doctor.

Rape and incest victims would have to report the assault within 48 hours of an abortion, and a patient must provide a doctor with a copy of a police report or a notarized letter before the procedure can be performed.

Abortions would also be allowed in cases of medical emergencies.

The bill now goes to the desk of Republican Gov. Jim Justice, who has signed several anti-abortion laws into law since taking office in 2017. Lawmakers resumed debate on the bill Tuesday after failing to reach an agreement in late July, giving up a chance for the state to be the first to pass new legislation limiting access to abortion since the Supreme Court the US ruled in June that its protected status as a constitutional right was abolished.

Both the Senate and the House of Representatives quickly approved the bill after several hours of debate.

Lawmakers inserted several provisions that they said were specifically aimed at the West Virginia Women’s Health Center, which was the state’s first abortion clinic when it opened in 1976 after the landmark Roe v. Wade of the US Supreme Court. It has existed for years as the state’s only abortion clinic, making it the ever-growing target of lawmakers and anti-abortion protesters.

The bill states that surgical abortions can only be performed in a state-licensed hospital by a physician with hospital privileges. Anyone else performing an abortion, including nurses and other medical professionals, faces three to 10 years in prison. A doctor who performs an illegal abortion could lose his license to practice medicine.

However, pregnant women who have illegal abortions will not be prosecuted under the bill.

Kaylen Barker, spokeswoman for the West Virginia Women’s Health Center, said the clinic will not close even if staff can no longer perform abortions. Like many clinics that perform abortions, the facility did not offer the procedure on a daily basis.

Most days are devoted to services like gender-affirming hormone therapy, HIV prevention and treatment, and routine pelvic care — cervical exams, cancer screening — mostly for low-income patients who are on Medicaid and have nowhere else to go.

Democratic Senator Owens Brown, West Virginia’s only black senator, opposed the bill before it passed the Senate. He said when he looks around at his fellow lawmakers, he sees a body made up mostly of middle-aged to older-aged white males who are middle-class or above.

Brown compared groups of men who passed laws overwhelmingly affecting women to laws passed by white legislators when slavery was legal in the United States. He said, “All laws are not good laws made by men.”

“That’s a bit irrational in a lot of ways, being able to apply a law that will never apply to you,” he told his fellow lawmakers. “It’s easy for you to sit and do this because you never have to face the consequences of your actions.”

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, transcribed or redistributed without permission.

]]>
It’s not “just the flu” https://isdepo.com/its-not-just-the-flu/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 22:47:28 +0000 https://isdepo.com/its-not-just-the-flu/ Editor’s note: Star Tribune Opinion publishes a mix of national and local Comments daily online and in print. To make a contribution, click here. ••• “It’s just the flu.” We’ve all heard this phrase many times, typically as a means of calming for or from someone suffering from a respiratory illness. During the COVID-19 pandemic […]]]>

Editor’s note: Star Tribune Opinion publishes a mix of national and local Comments daily online and in print. To make a contribution, click here.

•••

It’s just the flu.” We’ve all heard this phrase many times, typically as a means of calming for or from someone suffering from a respiratory illness.

During the COVID-19 pandemic “It is more than just the flu” was used to promote vaccination against COVID-19 and mitigation measures such as covering up. Well-meaning doctors are tweeting that COVID-19 is killing more children than seasonal flu in hopes this information will inspire vaccine-hesitating people to protect themselves Reputable media sources are reminding people that COVID-19 ‘hardly ever’ poses a serious threat to children, but also point out that COVID-19 still kills many more children than the flu did between 2020 and 2022. Even the popular Hulu series “Pam and Tommy” uses influenza as a metaphor to indicate that a certain situation is bad, but not yet an “epidemic”.

Now imagine hearing repeatedly that the flu is no big deal when you are one of the many thousands of people who experience the loss of a loved one to the flu each year. These words are not reassuring. They make you angry. After COVID-19, influenza is the deadliest vaccine-preventable disease in the United States. In fact, every US flu season over the past decade has had one resulted with an estimated 9 to 41 million illnesses, 140,000 to 710,000 hospitalizations and 12,000 to 52,000 deaths, including more than 100 children. There are also significant economic and public health burdens from influenza beyond hospitalizations and mortality, such as B. Loss of work and school days.

We are two of the many thousands of people who have been personally affected by the flu. Our previously healthy little boys, Joseph Marotta, 5, and JJ Neiman-Brown, 2, died “just of the flu” in 2009 and 2020, respectively. As scientists and mothers, and in the interest of preventing more deaths like this, we all ask that we all work together to dispel common misconceptions that minimize the threat of influenza.

Flu is dangerous. COVID-19 is dangerous. Measles are dangerous. Whooping cough is dangerous. It’s not a competition. Vaccines are available against these pathogens because they have caused a significant public health burden, including fatalities. Pitting these infectious diseases against each other like a horse race or a boxing match suggests that one of these common, highly contagious and deadly diseases is more worth preventing than another.

We recognize that changing the culture around these discussions might take some convincing. Our goal in this article is to summarize evidence that emphasizes the inappropriateness of minimizing influenza severity and supports the notion that we can simultaneously promote public health and medical responses to multiple serious respiratory diseases.

Childhood flu-related deaths are relatively rare but affect hundreds of families each year. For example, before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, 531 children in the US died from the flu in the 2017-18 and 2019-20 seasons. A recent study of US children comparing exposure to influenza and COVID-19 found that the prevalence of life-threatening diseases was low similar for both diseases. So why do we keep hearing that COVID-19 isn’t “just the flu”? As mothers who have lost their children to influenza, we can attest that it doesn’t feel so rare when it happens to your child.

Since 2004, when influenza-related childhood deaths became a nationally reportable (reportable) illness by state health officials to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 2,000 children have died from influenza. Those thousands of pediatric influenza deaths are also almost certainly one underestimate, reflects reality that some children who die from influenza complications may not be tested for influenza, that some tests may not always detect influenza virus (especially about a week after infection begins), and that influenza is not always listed on the death certificates of those who died from flu-related complications. About half of children who get the flu were previously healthy, a frightening surprise for many who assume the flu poses no threat her Child.

Data from 2017 to 2021 indicate that compared to COVID-19, the rate of pediatric influenza-related hospitalizations was similar or higher in children under 12 years of age, but was lower in adolescents 12 to 17 years of age. Like the mortality data, this hospitalization data indicates that influenza may be a more serious illness than COVID-19 for children, and especially younger children. So why do we keep hearing that COVID-19 isn’t “just the flu”?

The already serious threat posed by influenza is compounded in communities affected by the consequences of systemic racism, including inequalities in access to health care that result in the striking disparities in disease burden and health outcomes that often leave members historically marginalized characterize communities. For example, people from many racial and ethnic groups experience higher rates of severe flu-related episodes than white counterparts. A study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed significant racial/ethnic disparities in influenza-associated hospitalization rates, ICU admissions, and hospital mortality; These differences were even more pronounced in children. These trends were observed in non-Hispanic Black, non-Hispanic/Latino and Alaskan Native Americans, and Hispanic/Latino people. The pervasive minimization of the severity of influenza in our country and culture may actually compound these injustices, particularly given that members of historically marginalized communities often have relatively little access to quality health care.

We know that annual flu shots are the best protection against seasonal flu. Flu vaccines are life-saving for adults and children. Still, influenza immunization coverage is well below the 70% Healthy People 2030 target set by the US Department of Health and Human Services as a feasible goal for personal protection and community immunity. During the 2021-22 flu season, preliminary estimates of influenza vaccination rates among children, adults, and pregnant women in the United States was 55%, 45% and 52% respectively. These rates are even lower in historically marginalized populations. For example, 2021-22 immunization rates for Black children and adults were 47% and 35%, respectively.

There are various reasons people don’t get the flu shot every year, including the growing threat of vaccine misinformation, much of which is intentional. Another potential major reason is failure to recognize influenza as a health threat. And it doesn’t help to “move the needle” on the flu shot if we keep hearing “it’s just the flu.” GPs and specialists must make a strong commitment to influenza vaccination in all of their patients each season, emphasizing that co-administration of vaccines (e.g. influenza and COVID-19) is safe. Healthcare providers also need to recognize that the lack of a recommendation is still a recommendation: it is critical to actively and repeatedly promote annual influenza vaccination, beginning when a child is 6 months old. From this point of view, it is particularly important to recommend vaccination during pregnancy, as it is the best way to protect infants under 6 months. Ensuring that children have timely access to influenza testing and antiviral treatment soon after symptoms appear can also help prevent or mitigate severe flu-related consequences.

There’s no point playing deadly infectious diseases off against each other. Children and adults will die needlessly if we minimize the burden of disease and risk from influenza. It is long overdue to take the threat of the flu seriously. It is our collective responsibility as parents, caregivers, healthcare professionals, scientists and public health advocates to prioritize the actions needed for better influenza prevention and control.

Serese Marotta is Director of Advocacy and Education for Vaccinate your family. Maurine Neiman, a Minneapolis native, is a professor in the Department of Biology and the Department of Gender, Women’s, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Iowa. Marotta and Neiman present at the 15th National Conference on Vaccination Coalitions and Partnerships is scheduled to take place in Minneapolis next week.

]]> Gen Z and Millennials are twice as likely to develop high blood pressure during pregnancy https://isdepo.com/gen-z-and-millennials-are-twice-as-likely-to-develop-high-blood-pressure-during-pregnancy/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 05:16:15 +0000 https://isdepo.com/gen-z-and-millennials-are-twice-as-likely-to-develop-high-blood-pressure-during-pregnancy/ A new study from Northwestern Medicine shows that Gen Zers and Millennials are about twice as likely to be diagnosed with high blood pressure during pregnancy. Higher rates of hypertension persist even after adjusting for gestational age differences. High blood pressure during pregnancy increases and is one of the main causes of maternal mortality High […]]]>

A new study from Northwestern Medicine shows that Gen Zers and Millennials are about twice as likely to be diagnosed with high blood pressure during pregnancy.

Higher rates of hypertension persist even after adjusting for gestational age differences.

  • High blood pressure during pregnancy increases and is one of the main causes of maternal mortality
  • High blood pressure in pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of heart failure and stroke in the mother and premature birth or death in the baby
  • Pregnant Alaskan Indians and non-Hispanic blacks are most affected

Gen Zers and Millennials are about twice as likely to be diagnosed with high blood pressure during pregnancy, including preeclampsia and gestational hypertension, compared to Baby Boomers. This is true even after adjusting for age differences in pregnancy, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study.

This discovery is significant because it is widely believed that the rise in high blood pressure during pregnancy is due to people becoming pregnant at an older age. However, this research provides new evidence that high blood pressure rates during pregnancy are higher in individuals of younger generations, regardless of their age.

“Although there are many reasons for the observed generational alternations, we believe that in large part this is due to the observed generational decline in heart health,” said study author Dr. Sadiya Khan. She is an assistant professor of medicine Northwest University Feinberg School of Medicine and a Northwestern Medicine Physician. “We’re seeing more and more people in younger generations entering pregnancy with risk factors like obesity.”

Khan said the stakes are high.

“High blood pressure during pregnancy is a leading cause of death for both mothers and babies,” Khan said. “High blood pressure during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of heart failure and stroke in the mother and an increased risk of preterm birth, stunted growth, or death of the baby.”

The study was published in August 24, 2020 Open JAMA network.

Previous research from Northwestern and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has highlighted the nearly doubling of rates of high blood pressure in pregnancy over the past decade.

In fact, more than a million millennials have been diagnosed with high blood pressure during their first pregnancy, according to Khan. Racial and ethnic disparities also persisted in the four generations studied. According to the new Northwestern study, the highest rates of high blood pressure during pregnancy were among those who identified as non-Hispanic Native American/Alaskan and non-Hispanic Black.

“This is the first cross-generational study to go beyond maternal age or calendar year of delivery to understand patterns of hypertension in pregnancy,” Khan said. “This is particularly important when we consider the legacy of significant racial and ethnic differences in this high-risk disease, which affects not only the mother but also the baby.” This sets in motion a vicious cycle of generational health degradation by starting life with poorer heart health.”

“The public health and clinical message of this work is the need to broaden our perspective on screening and broaden our focus on prevention in all age groups before and during pregnancy, especially younger people who are not traditionally considered to be at high risk.” ‘ said study lead author Dr. Natalie Cameron. She is a Medical Instructor at Feinberg and a Physician for Northwestern Medicine.

Khan said that mobile health technologies (e.g. wearable devices) and telemedicine/remote health have opened up opportunities to improve blood pressure monitoring in an equitable way.

“Prevention and earlier detection can save lives and improve the health of future generations from birth,” Khan said.

The study was conducted using data from the National Vital Statistics System Natality Database, which contains birth certificate information for all live births in the United States. The study focused on people’s first pregnancies between 1995 and 2019 and included data from more than 38 million people. Using this data, the researchers were able to determine rates of hypertensive pregnancy disorders grouped by mother’s year of birth (maternal birth cohort) and her self-identified race or ethnicity.

Reference: “Association of Birth Year of Pregnant Individuals With Trends in Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy in the United States, 1995-2019” by Natalie A. Cameron, MD; Lucia C Petito, PhD; Nilay S Shah, MD, MPH; Amanda M. Perak, MD, MS; Janet M. Catov, PhD, MS; Natalie A Bello, MD, MPH; Simon Capewell, DSc, MD; Martin O’Flaherty, MD, MSc, PhD; Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, MD, ScM; Philip Greenland, MD; William A. Grobman, MD, MBA and Sadiya S. Khan, MD, MS, August 24, 2022, JAMA network open.
DOI: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.28093

Other Northwestern authors include Lucia C. Petito, Dr. Nilay S Shah, Dr. Amanda M Perak, Dr. Donald M. Lloyd Jones and Dr. Phillip Greenland.

This research was supported by grant 1R01HL161514 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health.

]]>
According to the WHO, there are one million cases of sexually transmitted infections every day https://isdepo.com/according-to-the-who-there-are-one-million-cases-of-sexually-transmitted-infections-every-day/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 09:46:35 +0000 https://isdepo.com/according-to-the-who-there-are-one-million-cases-of-sexually-transmitted-infections-every-day/ Photomicrograph in an acute case of gonococcal urethritis caused by the bacterium “Neisseria gonorrhoeae”. (CDC/Joe Miller | European press) According to the World Health Organization (WHO), there are one million cases of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) worldwide every day, specifically gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis and trichomoniasis. In addition, the agency warns of outbreaks of new infections […]]]>
Photomicrograph in an acute case of gonococcal urethritis caused by the bacterium “Neisseria gonorrhoeae”. (CDC/Joe Miller | European press)

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), there are one million cases of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) worldwide every day, specifically gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis and trichomoniasis.

In addition, the agency warns of outbreaks of new infections that can be acquired through sexual contact, such as monkeypox, ‘Shigella sonnei’, ‘Neisseria meningitidis’, Ebola and Zika, as well as a resurgence of neglected STIs, such as lymphogranuloma venereum, posing increasing challenges in providing prevention and control services for these infections.

And it is that if left untreated, some STIs can have irreversible long-term consequences, such as chronic pelvic pain, cancer, infertility, unwanted pregnancy, and congenital complications, some of which can be life-threatening.

For this reason, in May 2022, the 75th World Health Assembly agreed to implement new strategies for the global health sector to reduce new cases of syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia and trichomoniasis; reduction in new cases of congenital syphilis; increasing the percentage of girls vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV) at age 15; increase the percentage of screening for syphilis in the priority population and in pregnant women and for gonorrhea in the priority population; increasing the proportion of women screened for cervical cancer; and an increase in the number of countries reporting antimicrobial resistance to gonorrhea.

It also stressed the need to create an environment that encourages people to talk about STIs, engage in safe sex practices and seek treatment; expanding integration of primary prevention and sexually transmitted infections services; improved access to person-centric services; closing the funding gap; facilitating point-of-care diagnostics and introducing new technologies; And invest in research.

]]>
Jane Fonda Fast Facts – KRDO https://isdepo.com/jane-fonda-fast-facts-krdo/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 02:47:23 +0000 https://isdepo.com/jane-fonda-fast-facts-krdo/ CNN Editorial Research Here’s a look into the life of the activist and award-winning actress Jane Fonda. personally Date of birth: December 21, 1937 Place of birth: New-York, New-York Birth Name: Lady Jayne Seymour Fonda Father: Henry Fonda, actor Mother: Frances Ford Seymour (Brokaw) Fonda, Celebrities marriages: Ted Turner (December 21, 1991 – May 22, […]]]>

CNN Editorial Research

Here’s a look into the life of the activist and award-winning actress Jane Fonda.

personally

Date of birth: December 21, 1937

Place of birth: New-York, New-York

Birth Name: Lady Jayne Seymour Fonda

Father: Henry Fonda, actor

Mother: Frances Ford Seymour (Brokaw) Fonda, Celebrities

marriages: Ted Turner (December 21, 1991 – May 22, 2001, divorced); Tom Hayden (January 20, 1973–1990, divorced); Roger Vadim (August 14, 1965 – January 16, 1973, divorced)

Children: with Tom Hayden: Troy Garity (July 7, 1973); with Roger Vadim: Vanessa (September 28, 1968)

Education: Attended Vassar College, 1956-1958

Other facts

She is a member of a distinguished family of actors, daughter of actor Henry Fonda, sister of actor and director Peter Fonda, aunt of actress Bridget Fonda and mother of actor Troy Garity and documentary filmmaker Vanessa Vadim.

Her mother’s family can be traced back to Jane Seymour, Henry VIII’s third wife. Jane’s mother, Frances Ford Seymour, committed suicide when Jane was 12 years old.

In 1980, 14-year-old Mary Luana Williams of Oakland, California, daughter of an incarcerated member of the Black Panthers, joined Fonda in Santa Monica, California. Mary, who never officially adopted her, is still believed to be Jane’s daughter. in 2010, Mary has reconnected with her birth family for the first time in 30 years.

Fonda started her fitness empire in 1979 with the aerobic studio Jane Fonda’s Workout. The studio released a workout book and VHS tapes and later DVDs.

Nominated for seven Academy Awards and won two.

Nominated for five Primetime Emmy Awards and won one.

Nominated for two Tony Awards.

timeline

1954 – First appears in the play “The Country Girl” at the Community House in Omaha, Nebraska.

1959 – Professional model who appears on the cover of Vogue and other magazines.

April 6, 1960 – Her first film, Tall Story, is released.

October 10, 1968 – Barbarella, starring Fonda and directed by her husband Roger Vadim, is released.

1970 – Activist work begins, first with involvement in Native American causes and later with what she calls her “GI movement.”

1971-1972 – The FTA Show, an anti-war USO show starring Fonda, Donald Sutherland and many others, opens near Fort Bragg, North Carolina and later tours to military bases in Southeast Asia.

April 10, 1972 – Won an Academy Award for Best Actress for Klute.

July 7, 1972 – Travels to North Vietnam for two weeks. During her visit, she meets with the Viet Cong at an anti-aircraft site and poses for photos with them. She also meets with American prisoners of war and denounces “US imperialism” on Viet Cong radio. This trip earned her the nickname “Hanoi Jane”.

1976 – Co-founded the Campaign for Economic Democracy with husband Tom Hayden.

1977-1991 – Owns and operates Laurel Springs Ranch, a summer performing arts camp for children of all socioeconomic backgrounds.

April 9, 1979 – Won an Academy Award for Best Actress for “Coming Home”.

December 4, 1981 – On Golden Pond, the only film starring Fonda and her father, is released.

Aug 12, 1982 – Her father Henry Fonda dies.

09/23/1984 – Wins an Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or Special for The Dollmaker.

June 17, 1988 – On ABC’s 20/20, Fonda apologizes for her actions in 1972. “I want to say something, not just to the Vietnam veterans in New England, but . . . to the men who were there Vietnam, who . . . I have hurt or whose pain I have deepened by the things I said or did. I . . . feel I owe them an apology.”

1994 – Appointed Goodwill Ambassador United Nations population fund.

1995 – Founds the Georgia Campaign for Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention.

December 2000 – Emory University in Atlanta founds the “Jane Fonda Center” with an initial gift from Fonda herself. The center’s mission is to disseminate information that can help reduce risks related to adolescent reproduction, body image and burgeoning sexuality.

2001 – Publicly revealed that she has become a Christian.

2001 – Returns to the stage in the play The Vagina Monologues.

April 2005 – Fonda’s memoirs, “My life so far,” Is published.

May 13, 2005 – Fonda’s first film in 15 years, Monster-in-Law, opens.

May 2007 – Receives a special award, the Palme d’Or, for his career at the Cannes Film Festival.

April 27, 2013 – Fonda leaves her hand and footprint in cement next to her father’s in front of the Chinese Theater in Hollywood. Henry Fondas were left there on July 24, 1942.

08/16/2013 – Premiere of “The Butler”. Fonda portrayed former First Lady Nancy Reagan.

March 4, 2014 – Random House publishes Fonda’s book, Being a Teen: Everything Teen Girls & Boys Should Know About Relationships, Sex, Love, Health, Identity & More.

June 5, 2014 – The American Film Institute presents Fonda with the 42nd AFI Life Achievement Award.

May 8, 2015 – Grace and Frankie, a Netflix series starring Fonda and Lily Tomlin, premieres.

December 1, 2016 – Time Magazine publishes one op ed from fonda about the Protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

January 15, 2018 – Reveals in an interview that her doctor removed a cancerous growth from her lower lip.

09/24/2018 – “Jane Fonda in Five Acts” a documentary, premiering on HBO.

May 30, 2019 – The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) announces that Fonda will receive the Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film at the 2019 British Academy Britannia Awards. The award ceremony will take place on October 25, 2019.

October 11 – December 20, 2019 – arrested five times In the US Capitol during the climate protests. Fonda says she moved to Washington for four months and plans to be arrested every Friday to raise awareness of the climate crisis. She calls for the protests “Fire drills on Fridays.”

September 8, 2020 – What Can I Do?: My Journey From Climate Despair To Action is published.

February 28, 2021 – Receives the Cecil B. DeMille Lifetime Achievement Award at the 78th Golden Globe Awards.

The CNN Wire
™ & © 2022 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery company. All rights reserved.

]]>