Birth Control – Is Depo http://isdepo.com/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 07:07:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://isdepo.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/isdepo-150x150.png Birth Control – Is Depo http://isdepo.com/ 32 32 Stacey Abrams has been criticized for claiming a fetus’s 6-week heartbeat is “an artificial sound” to help men control women https://isdepo.com/stacey-abrams-has-been-criticized-for-claiming-a-fetuss-6-week-heartbeat-is-an-artificial-sound-to-help-men-control-women/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 05:42:00 +0000 https://isdepo.com/stacey-abrams-has-been-criticized-for-claiming-a-fetuss-6-week-heartbeat-is-an-artificial-sound-to-help-men-control-women/ ATLANTA, GEORGIA: Progressive Georgia Democrat Stacey Abrams has faced backlash after claiming there is “no such thing” as a fetal heartbeat at six weeks and insisting it was just “manufactured sounds.” designed to give men control over women’s bodies. The Peach State gubernatorial candidate made the stunning comment at an event in Atlanta on Tuesday, […]]]>

ATLANTA, GEORGIA: Progressive Georgia Democrat Stacey Abrams has faced backlash after claiming there is “no such thing” as a fetal heartbeat at six weeks and insisting it was just “manufactured sounds.” designed to give men control over women’s bodies.

The Peach State gubernatorial candidate made the stunning comment at an event in Atlanta on Tuesday, Sept. 20: “There’s no such thing as a heartbeat at six weeks. It’s an artificial sound designed to convince people that men have the right to take control of a woman’s body.” Democrat Stacey is a pro-choice advocate, but many netizens said her statement was contradictory is that the fetal heart is not yet fully developed but is in the process of development. “Hearing my baby’s heartbeat at 6 weeks is undoubtedly one of the most exciting,” tweeted Meghan McCain, daughter of the late Senator John McCain. “Stacey Abrams is a very sick person to say this and somehow accuse doctors of faking fetal heartbeats. Point.”

ADVERTISEMENT

CONTINUE READING

‘You would know about patterns’: Khloé Kardashian fans troll Tristan Thompson over CRYPTIC posts

2021 in review: 5 moments that changed the face of American politics

ADVERTISEMENT



According to the American Pregnancy Association, “A fetal heartbeat can be detected by vaginal ultrasound between 5 1/2 and 6 1/2 weeks if the fetal pole is visible.” “The fetal pole can be detected at a crown-rump length ( CRL) can be seen from 2-4mm, and the heartbeat can be seen as a regular flutter when the CRL has reached 5mm,” the organization explains. Sports commentator Michele Tafoya tweeted: “So @staceyabrams… When my (male) doctors told me they couldn’t hear my baby’s heartbeat… as I was losing pregnancy after pregnancy… Was that fake too? Did they fabricate my baby’s lack of a heartbeat to force me to terminate the pregnancy?” Abrams campaign spokesman Alex Floyd told the New York Post that they used the Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey supported guidelines in which judges determined that a fetus was viable at around 23 weeks. “Doctors have been clear that the so-called ‘heartbeat law’ is not medically correct,” said Alex Floyd.

ADVERTISEMENT



Responding to GOP Senator Lindsey Graham’s proposal to create a national standard banning abortion at 15 weeks, Stacey said she supports the decision “up to the point of birth.” “I believe that abortion is a medical decision, not a political decision,” she said. “And arbitrary, politically defined schedules are deeply problematic because they ignore the reality of medical and physiological problems. For example, a six-week ban tells women they must make reproductive decisions before they know they are pregnant. And that arbitrariness extends to these artificial timelines as well,” Stacey explained.

ADVERTISEMENT

Social media users had mixed reactions to Stacey’s comment, and many had their own theories. One said: “She’s right. At 6 weeks there is NO fetus, it is an embryo and the US flicker is electrical activity. No heart has formed, so it’s impossible to have a detectable heartbeat on the machine. A heartbeat can only be heard after 10-12 weeks”. Another user wrote: “Is the fetal heart fully developed? OF COURSE NOT. But it is still contracting, in the process of its development.” The user then explains embryology to other internet users with a picture of the diagram and says “Note that the detail heart has four chambers at five weeks.”

ADVERTISEMENT




ADVERTISEMENT


One user, who has suffered multiple miscarriages both before and after a heart attack, said it was just offensive: “What the hell is she talking about!! I couldn’t be more offended by that statement! Key factor confirmed by all my documents!” Another remarked, “Look at how they willingly eat up the BS. Blind loyalty to race and identity-based ideologies is killing this country. It’s a slow death.” One user simply tweeted, “Life begins at conception so this arbitrary argument is irrelevant to me.” birth is approaching,” read another tweet. “You know what would really help? Easy and cheap access to birth control and proper health care,” added another.

ADVERTISEMENT




ADVERTISEMENT





ADVERTISEMENT




ADVERTISEMENT

]]>
4 out of 5 maternal deaths in 2017-19 were preventable, the analysis found https://isdepo.com/4-out-of-5-maternal-deaths-in-2017-19-were-preventable-the-analysis-found/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 12:38:37 +0000 https://isdepo.com/4-out-of-5-maternal-deaths-in-2017-19-were-preventable-the-analysis-found/ The analysis released Monday showed the deaths were disproportionately occurring among women of color, including Black and Indigenous mothers, USA Today reported. Other reproductive health and abortion news is coming from Indiana, Michigan, New Hampshire, Texas and elsewhere. USA Today: CDC analysis shows more than 80% of maternal deaths in the US are preventable A […]]]>

The analysis released Monday showed the deaths were disproportionately occurring among women of color, including Black and Indigenous mothers, USA Today reported. Other reproductive health and abortion news is coming from Indiana, Michigan, New Hampshire, Texas and elsewhere.

USA Today: CDC analysis shows more than 80% of maternal deaths in the US are preventable

A staggering number of maternal deaths in the United States have proven preventable, according to a federal analysis of maternal deaths data released Monday. More than 80%, or about 4 in 5 maternal deaths over a two-year period, were due to preventable causes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report. (Hassanein, 19.9.)

In Updates on the Fight for Abortion Rights —

Reuters: Planned Parenthood, others urge Indiana judge to block abortion ban

An affiliate of Planned Parenthood and other abortion rights groups and providers Monday asked an Indiana judge to block the state’s ban on most abortions, which went into effect last Thursday. Kenneth Falk, an attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana, told Judge Kelsey Hanlon in Indianapolis that the ban violated privacy and civil liberties, which Falk said were guaranteed by the state’s constitution. The ACLU, along with Planned Parenthood, sued Great Northwest, Hawaii, Alaska, Indiana, Kentucky and others to challenge the law. (Pierson, 9/19)

Detroit Free Press: Michigan pharmacists can prescribe birth control pills, patch, ring

Soon, getting hormonal birth control in Michigan can be as easy as stopping by your local pharmacy. That’s because the state Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs on Monday issued a new interpretation of the Michigan Public Health Code that allows physicians to work with pharmacists to directly administer hormonal birth control. (Jordan Shamus, 19.9.)

The Boston Globe: On abortion, NH Republican Senate challenger has message: ‘Get over it’

At one level, the Republican Senate candidate from New Hampshire just said out loud what many political strategists have urged GOP candidates to do: stop talking about abortion and focus on the economy. But in a weekend interview, Don Bolduc, the hard-line retired brigadier general, delivered that advice to his opponent, Democratic US Senator Maggie Hassan, and criticized her focus on overturned constitutional abortion rights. “Get over it,” Bolduc said on WMUR CloseUp. (Ebbert, 19.9.)

AP: Ad spending shows Dems pinning hopes on abortion in the medium term

Democrats are pumping an unprecedented amount of money into abortion rights ads, underscoring how central the message is to the party in the final weeks before the November midterm elections. With the most intense phase of the campaign just beginning, Democrats have already invested more than an estimated $124 million in abortion-related TV ads this year. That’s more than twice the money Democrats’ next top issue this year, “character,” and nearly 20 times more than Democrats spent on abortion-related ads in midterms 2018. (People and Kessler, 9/20)

Likewise –

AP: They terminated wanted pregnancies. Post-Roe, you face new pains.

Ashley Lefebvre hugs her unborn daughter’s urn every night. Sarah Halsey appreciates the tiny hat worn by her baby, who lived just 38 minutes. Abi Frazier moved away from home with a furnished nursery. All terminated intended pregnancies due to serious fetal medical problems. It’s an aspect of abortion that’s rarely discussed in national debates — the termination of pregnancies because of fetal abnormalities or other often fatal medical problems. These abortions often occur in the second trimester, when women have already chosen names, bought baby clothes, and felt a kick in the stomach. They are very different from the most common abortions performed earlier in pregnancies. (Hungarian, September 18)

The Texas Tribune: How Texas abortion laws turned a heartbreaking fetal diagnosis into a cross-country trip

Protesters outside Seattle’s abortion clinic brandished images of bloody fetuses, shouted that she was a “baby killer” and begged her to choose life. Lauren Hall, 27, fought the urge to shout back and tell them how much she wishes life was a choice she could have made. (Klibanoff, 20.9.)

KHN: Texas, Battle Teen Pregnancy, recasts Sexual Education Standards

JR Chester became pregnant the summer before her senior year of high school. She was a bright student with good grades, gave birth, graduated, and was pregnant again by the time she entered college that fall. She was a teenage mom—like her mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother. Her school did not teach sexual health and contraception was a foreign word. Her sons are now teenagers. “If you don’t know your options, you don’t have any,” said Chester, now program director of Healthy Futures of Texas, a nonprofit sexual health and education organization. (Huetteman, 9/20)

This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.

]]>
The first over-the-counter birth control pill could come to Alabama if FDA approves https://isdepo.com/the-first-over-the-counter-birth-control-pill-could-come-to-alabama-if-fda-approves/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 21:02:00 +0000 https://isdepo.com/the-first-over-the-counter-birth-control-pill-could-come-to-alabama-if-fda-approves/ BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WBRC) — In November, the FDA will review a birth control product called Opill to see if it can be safely sold over-the-counter without having to see a doctor. There is currently no other contraceptive pill in the United States that does not require a prescription. dr Wes Stubblefield with ADPH said Opill […]]]>

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WBRC) — In November, the FDA will review a birth control product called Opill to see if it can be safely sold over-the-counter without having to see a doctor. There is currently no other contraceptive pill in the United States that does not require a prescription.

dr Wes Stubblefield with ADPH said Opill has been on the market for a while and is a progesterone-only pill, so it contains no estrogen. He said the estrogen component of a pill can usually cause problems for women taking birth control, and one reason is that they do tests at the doctor’s. He said that since Opill has no estrogen, it may not need a prescription.

He said only progesterone pills are endorsed by national organizations and are safe. Stubblefield said if Opill were FDA approved, it would improve access to medical care across the state.

But he said over-the-counter drugs can be abused and shouldn’t be used as an excuse not to see a doctor.

“If they’re not taken properly, they don’t work very well,” Stubblefield said of birth control pills. “People need to know that they are taking them appropriately, that they can get them and that they can afford them. They need to take them as prescribed, understand the risks and benefits, and make sure they follow their regular scheduled check-ups to ensure they stay healthy.”

We don’t know how much the pill would cost if FDA approved, but Stubblefield said to keep it accessible, it has to be affordable.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE WBRC FOX6 NEWS APP

Subscribe to our WBRC newsletter and get the latest local news and weather straight to your email.

Copyright 2022 WBRC. All rights reserved.

]]>
Opening of a new health clinic in Paso Robles https://isdepo.com/opening-of-a-new-health-clinic-in-paso-robles/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 23:46:24 +0000 https://isdepo.com/opening-of-a-new-health-clinic-in-paso-robles/ The new Paso Robles Clinic brings together public health and behavioral health services – San Luis Obispo County Behavioral Health Clinics and San Luis Obispo County Public Health Clinics are now under one roof in a new facility in Paso Robles and provide a wide range of services to those living in northern San Luis […]]]>

The new Paso Robles Clinic brings together public health and behavioral health services

– San Luis Obispo County Behavioral Health Clinics and San Luis Obispo County Public Health Clinics are now under one roof in a new facility in Paso Robles and provide a wide range of services to those living in northern San Luis County Obispo live or work. The new facility is located at 805 4th Street, with parking nearby.

Located on the first floor of the building, which opened in December 2021, is the Drug and Alcohol Behavioral Health Unit, which offers a variety of services and programs to support community members affected by substance use disorders. These include recovery services, outpatient treatment and drink driving programs. On the second floor of the building, Behavioral Health offers adolescent psychiatric services and substance abuse treatment for adolescents and families, including individual and family therapy programs, rehabilitation, case management and more. All behavioral health services are designed to help people with mental illness and/or substance use disorders achieve the highest quality of life by providing programs that focus on the overall needs of clients and their families.

“The beauty of this building on 4th Street and Spring Street is that we truly are a one-stop shop for community members in North County,” said Kimberly Mott, Behavioral Health Program Supervisor. “Our team is committed to bringing a wide range of behavioral health services under one roof so we can better help individuals and their families achieve overall well-being and recovery in multiple areas of their lives.”

The Public Health department, which moved into the new premises in July, is located on the second floor of the building. Public health services include the Women, Infant, and Child (WIC) Nutrition Program and Reproductive Health Programs, which provide a wide range of friendly, confidential, free, or low-cost reproductive and sexual health services for women, men, and youth.

“We are so proud of this new, state-of-the-art facility that is conveniently located in downtown Paso Robles and easily accessible to our community, including those who use public transportation,” said Jenny Taranto, Supervising Public Health Nurse. “Through this new facility, you can get all kinds of healthcare services, like birth control, emergency contraception, and testing for sexually transmitted infections. We also have a full immunization clinic where we administer COVID-19 vaccinations and boosters, as well as a variety of travel vaccines.”

These services include:

  • Birth control (including IUDs and birth control pills)
  • Free condoms (just stop by during opening hours – basket is in front of the front door)
  • Emergency Contraception (Plan B)
  • pregnancy test
  • Cancer screening (smear tests and breast exams)
  • HIV test
  • STD test and treatment
  • PrEP and PEP (HIV prevention)
  • Vaccination, including routine and travel vaccinations

“Any community member can use these services, and you don’t need a doctor’s referral to access the clinic,” Taranto said. “Many community members may be eligible for free services through Family PACT, Medi-Cal or Medicare. Public Health also accepts private insurance. Fees are tiered for all other community members.”

The Paso Robles clinic is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and services are available by appointment at (805) 237-3050. Community members who wish to open psychiatric or drug and alcohol services should call 800-838-1381.

About the author: news staff

The Paso Robles Daily News news team wrote or edited this story from local contributors and press releases. News staff can be reached at info@pasoroblesdailynews.com.

]]>
Combined birth control pills linked to increased risk of blood clots in obese women – ScienceDaily https://isdepo.com/combined-birth-control-pills-linked-to-increased-risk-of-blood-clots-in-obese-women-sciencedaily/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 01:02:44 +0000 https://isdepo.com/combined-birth-control-pills-linked-to-increased-risk-of-blood-clots-in-obese-women-sciencedaily/ Obese women who use oral contraceptives that contain estrogen and a progestogen have a 24-fold increased risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE) compared to non-obese women who do not use these drugs, according to a review published today in ESC heart failure, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). The author of the […]]]>

Obese women who use oral contraceptives that contain estrogen and a progestogen have a 24-fold increased risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE) compared to non-obese women who do not use these drugs, according to a review published today in ESC heart failure, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

The author of the study, Professor Giuseppe Rosano from IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, Rome, Italy, said: “It is well known that both obesity and contraceptives containing estrogen are risk factors for VTE. Despite this, obese women continue to receive these drugs.” Scientific evidence indicates that obesity and combined oral contraceptives have a synergistic effect on VTE risk and this should be taken into account in prescribing decisions. Progestogen-only products including pills, IUDs or implants, are a safer alternative to the combined pill in overweight women. “

This review article highlights the latest evidence on the independent effects of obesity and contraceptives and their synergistic effects on VTE risk and provides clinical recommendations. VTE refers to a blood clot in a vein and includes two life-threatening conditions: deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.

The World Health Organization estimates that the global prevalence of obesity almost tripled between 1975 and 2016 – with 15% of adult women being obese. The risk of VTE increases progressively with body mass index (BMI) and is more than twice as high in obese women as in non-obese women. Obesity has the greatest impact on VTE women under the age of 40, who have a five-fold increased risk compared to non-obese women. Professor Rosano noted: “The particularly high risk in obese women under 40 is important, as many at this age are looking for contraception.”

Combined oral contraceptives are associated with an increased risk of VTE, with users having a three to seven-fold increased risk of VTE compared to non-users. In contrast, progestogen-only products are not associated with an increased risk of VTE.

The combination of overweight/obesity and the use of combined oral contraceptives increases the likelihood of blood clots in women of childbearing potential. For example, a large population-based study found that being overweight and obese are associated with a 1.7-fold and 2.4-fold increased risk of VTE, respectively. However, in combined pill users, the risk of VTE was 12 times higher in overweight women and 24 times higher in obese women – compared to non-users of normal weight.

Professor Rosano said: “Obese women using contraceptives are vulnerable to VTE and should take steps to limit their other predisposing factors to cardiovascular disease, for example by quitting smoking and increasing their physical activity.”

story source:

Materials provided by European Society of Cardiology. Note: Content can be edited for style and length.

]]>
Britney Spears says she will ‘probably never perform again’ after ‘trauma’ Britney Spears https://isdepo.com/britney-spears-says-she-will-probably-never-perform-again-after-trauma-britney-spears/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://isdepo.com/britney-spears-says-she-will-probably-never-perform-again-after-trauma-britney-spears/ Britney Spears fans, hoping the pop star will perform live again now that she’s freed from an infamous conservatory that ruled her life for more than a decade, might not want to hold their breath. In an Instagram post on Sunday, Spears said she was “quite traumatized” by her work on stage under the Conservatory […]]]>

Britney Spears fans, hoping the pop star will perform live again now that she’s freed from an infamous conservatory that ruled her life for more than a decade, might not want to hold their breath.

In an Instagram post on Sunday, Spears said she was “quite traumatized” by her work on stage under the Conservatory and said she would “probably never perform again” despite her recent collaboration with Elton John, Hold Me Closer. experienced professional resurgence.

The 40-year-old singer said she was devastated that she had no creative control over her music videos while she was involuntarily under the conservatory, which was primarily run by her father Jamie Spears from 2008 to 2021.

Spears also criticized photos taken by former conservators during the performances, saying she was uncomfortable with the number of dancers by her side during a four-year residency in Las Vegas.

“I’d rather … take pictures of myself in studios than work with the most obnoxious people in my life,” Spears said. “I’m pretty traumatized for life and yes I’m pissed as hell and no I probably won’t perform again just because I’m stubborn and will make my point.”

Her post on Sunday ended with the words, “Kiss my Goddamn motherfucking ass.”

The remarks were the first since the end of her conservatory in which Spears directly addressed whether she planned to resume live performances. She had previously spoken about how she was probably on stage through singing.

Raised in Kentwood, Louisiana about 90 miles northwest of New Orleans, Spears stormed the late 1990s and early 2000s with hits like Oops! I Did It Again, Baby One More Time, Toxic and Gimme More.

But amid intense scrutiny of her personal relationships, she displayed erratic behavior in public, and her father and his legal advisers placed her under guardianship that essentially prevented her from doing anything for herself.

Spears said the agreement limited her, among other things, to receiving a $2,000 weekly allowance during her stay in Las Vegas, which netted more than $160 million. She also couldn’t get married or administer her own contraception, she said.

A judge ended the conservatory in November 2021, to the delight of fans who started the #FreeBritney movement online and sometimes on the streets.

Spears has since married her longtime boyfriend, actor Sam Asghari, and released the duet with Elton John. Hold Me Closer topped the streaming charts in more than 40 countries. A video was reportedly in the works. But Spears hasn’t performed live since her Las Vegas residency ended in 2017.

Her post on Sunday also came after she made headlines by releasing a series of audio clips in which she spoke about her estrangement from her two sons, aged 16 and 15, from a previous marriage.

One of the boys, Jayden, gave an interview to 60 Minutes Australia in which he said he didn’t come to his mother’s wedding because she “didn’t invite [the] entire family”.

Among those who weren’t invited were Jayden’s father, Kevin Federline, and his maternal grandfather, Jamie Spears.

Spears said of her sons, “Since they’ve been gone, I honestly feel like a big part of me has died.”

]]>
We had to end a failed pregnancy https://isdepo.com/we-had-to-end-a-failed-pregnancy/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 06:02:44 +0000 https://isdepo.com/we-had-to-end-a-failed-pregnancy/ Kyle Maxwell I never imagined that my journey to fatherhood would begin with the termination of a wanted pregnancy. Just months after getting married in the majestic beauty of the mountains east of Albuquerque, my wife and I were standing in the bathroom waiting for the results of our first pregnancy test. The tiny digital […]]]>
Kyle Maxwell

I never imagined that my journey to fatherhood would begin with the termination of a wanted pregnancy.

Just months after getting married in the majestic beauty of the mountains east of Albuquerque, my wife and I were standing in the bathroom waiting for the results of our first pregnancy test. The tiny digital display showed one word: pregnant.

We waited anxiously for our visits to the doctor to begin. On the first ultrasound we only saw a blinking dot of a heartbeat. Just weeks later, we saw our baby, now the size of a lime, with recognizable arms and legs reassuringly rocking back and forth on the screen.

My joy quickly turned to fear. The fetus had more than normal fluid behind the neck, which correlates with a number of genetic disorders. A week later, chorionic villus sampling (CVS) confirmed a whole chromosome genetic disorder that often results in pregnancy losses but can be treated with a reasonable quality of life if the baby makes it to term.

Having to endure my wife’s terrible morning sickness, we decided to give our little girl a chance and see if she would survive.

As early as possible we went for a full anatomical ultrasound to see if the internal organs are forming properly. They were not. The medical technician listed half a dozen illnesses, including severe hydrops. We had to ask the doctor before they rushed off, “Will our baby make it to term?” The answer was quick: “unlikely.”

My wife was still barely able to eat because of the morning sickness that lasted all day. We knew we couldn’t take any more of it than we had to. We had to terminate the missing pregnancy.

After the procedure, we received resources on miscarriage support groups. I didn’t know at the time if it was necessary, but grief comes in stages, beginning with denial. Even now, six years later, the memory of our loss brings tears to my eyes.

With the inversion of Roe v. Wade, I’m filled with renewed pain and heartache, the same pain I feel with renewed vigour, each year when we never reach the due date. America has restored to states the right to oppress the individual and control their medical decisions.

Do we really believe that people carelessly use abortion as birth control? Does former President Trump accurately describe it as “snatched from its mother just before birth”? No, these inflammatory statements are meant to infuriate people to the point where they can’t think straight.

… Having to choose to have an abortion hurts enough as it is. We cannot accept these false narratives.

New Mexico has become one of the last bastions of reproductive medicine in the southern United States. We must protect our rights; We can no longer close clinics. We need to vote in primary and local elections, raise our voice and get involved. … protect love and family, retain freedom of choice.

]]>
Republican filibuster could kill S. Carolina’s abortion ban https://isdepo.com/republican-filibuster-could-kill-s-carolinas-abortion-ban/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 23:05:50 +0000 https://isdepo.com/republican-filibuster-could-kill-s-carolinas-abortion-ban/ COLUMBIA, SC (AP) — The South Carolina Senate leader acknowledged Thursday that a bill banning almost all abortions in South Carolina may not pass despite significant Republican support. The hurdle to implementing the measure, which would have included exemptions for pregnancies caused by rape or incest up to 12 weeks after conception, came when Republican […]]]>

COLUMBIA, SC (AP) — The South Carolina Senate leader acknowledged Thursday that a bill banning almost all abortions in South Carolina may not pass despite significant Republican support.

The hurdle to implementing the measure, which would have included exemptions for pregnancies caused by rape or incest up to 12 weeks after conception, came when Republican Senator Tom Davis launched a filibuster.

Davis opposes a blanket ban on abortion in South Carolina and said he will argue against the law until the 46-seat Senate collects the 26 votes needed to end the filibuster. That seemed unlikely after 24 senators voted in favor of an amended bill that included exceptions for pregnancies due to rape or incest up to 12 weeks after conception. Twenty senators opposed and two were absent.

After pausing to work through her options, Senate Majority Leader Shane Massey conceded that the abortion ban is unlikely to pass, despite the lack of a vote to end the debate.

“This is a math question, you have to have the votes to pass it – and we don’t,” Massey said.

Davis said he promised his daughters that he would not vote to tighten South Carolina’s current six-week abortion ban because women have rights too.

“The moment we get pregnant, we lost all control of what happens to our bodies,” Davis said, recalling what his daughters told him. “I’m here to tell you I won’t let that happen.”

Davis, a senator since 2009 and once chief of staff to former Gov. Mark Sanford, was supported by the three Republican women in the Senate, a fifth Republican senator and all the Democrats in the chamber.

South Carolina’s six-week ban is currently on hold as the state Supreme Court reviews whether it violates privacy rights. Meanwhile, the 2016 government ban on abortion applies 20 weeks after conception.

Republicans worked for two days to reinstate the exemptions in the bill. The South Carolina General Assembly is convening a special session to try to join more than a dozen other states with abortion bans.

Most of them came through so-called trigger legislation aimed at banning most abortions when the US Supreme Court overturned the constitutional right to terminate a pregnancy in June. The Indiana legislature issued a new ban last month that has not gone into effect.

The House of Representatives passed the law last month, with similar exceptions for rape or incest, and also required the doctor to tell the woman that the rape would be reported to the police before the abortion, and that report within 24 hours with the name and contact information to submit to the woman. There are also exceptions to allowing abortion if the mother’s life is endangered by the pregnancy.

The Senate this week added an additional exemption allowing abortions if a doctor determines a fetus cannot live outside the womb, meaning if senators pass the bill, it will return to the House.

The debate began Wednesday with the three Republican women in the South Carolina Senate speaking back-to-back and saying they cannot support the bill unless exceptions for rape or incest are restored.

Sen. Katrina Shealy said the 41 men in the Senate would be better off listening to their wives, daughters, mothers and granddaughters and looking at the faces of the girls in their churches’ Sunday School classes.

“You want to think that God wants you to pass legislation that kills mothers and ruins children’s lives without exception – letting mothers bring babies home to bury them – then I think you are miscommunicating with God. Or maybe you don’t communicate with Him at all,” Shealy said, before the senators added a proposal that would allow abortions if a fetus cannot survive outside the womb.

Senate Majority Leader Shane Massey helped negotiate the compromise between Republicans that returned the exemptions from the bill. He pointed out that in 2021, state health officials recorded about 3,000 abortions within the first six weeks of a pregnancy, while the six-week ban was overturned by a federal court when Roe v. Wade was lifted.

“Heartbeat is great, but I think this is better,” Massey said. “I don’t think abortion should be used as birth control.”

Republican Sen. Sandy Senn, who did not vote for the six-week ban in 2021, said a total ban would be an invasion of the privacy of every woman in the state.

“If what’s going on inside my vagina isn’t an unreasonable invasion of privacy that this Legislature should get involved in, I don’t know what is,” Senn said.

___

Associated Press writer James Pollard contributed to this report.

___

Follow Jeffrey Collins on Twitter at https://twitter.com/JSCollinsAP.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, transcribed or redistributed without permission.

]]>
Does Medicaid Cover Birth Control? https://isdepo.com/does-medicaid-cover-birth-control/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 13:20:03 +0000 https://isdepo.com/does-medicaid-cover-birth-control/ Medicaid is a national program that provides health insurance to more than 81 million people in the United States. In most states, Medicaid covers birth control at no cost to the patient. Family planning with Medicaid Federal laws say this state Medicaid Programs must provide free family planning services to the patient. As a broad […]]]>

Medicaid is a national program that provides health insurance to more than 81 million people in the United States. In most states, Medicaid covers birth control at no cost to the patient.

Family planning with Medicaid

Federal laws say this state Medicaid Programs must provide free family planning services to the patient. As a broad category, family planning can include contraception as well as other related services such as screening for sexually transmitted infections, HIV and cancer.

Aside from this general requirement, federal regulations do not specify what benefits states must include in family planning insurance. That can make the list of what’s fully covered depend on where you live. Still, birth control is what most people think of when referring to family planning services, and most states cover it, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), passed in 2010, some states have expanded some or all Medicaid health care benefits to additional low-income Americans even if they don’t meet other eligibility requirements. States could choose to expand only family planning services or offer all Medicaid benefits to a broader group of people.

The 38 states (plus Washington, DC) that have opted for full Medicaid expansion must adhere to stricter rules for coverage for people who qualify for the expansion. Similar to most private insurers, these state Medicaid programs are required to provide patients with free preventative care, including birth control.

What Birth Control Does Medicaid Cover?

If your state Medicaid program covers birth control, it will cover methods approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. These methods fall into broad groups:

  • Patient education and counseling.

  • Hormonal methods, including birth control pills and vaginal rings.

  • Implanted devices such as B. IUDs or IUDs.

  • Barrier methods, including diaphragms and sponges.

  • sterilization process.

Although the ACA does not require coverage vasectomiesThe Kaiser Family Foundation reported that most of the state Medicaid programs it examined covered this procedure.

As private insurers, state Medicaid programs may have restrictions to control costs. That means you may encounter restrictions on the brands or quantity of medication you can get. You may also need a prescription for some over-the-counter birth control methods to have full coverage.

Contact your state’s Medicaid office for coverage details.

]]>
echoes. A deserted future. Published on 9/2/2022 https://isdepo.com/echoes-a-deserted-future-published-on-9-2-2022/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 12:40:38 +0000 https://isdepo.com/echoes-a-deserted-future-published-on-9-2-2022/ Photo by Guilherme Stecanella on Unsplash A more humane society A deserted future Richard Dorflinger Friday 2 September 2022Culture Help us expand our reach! Please share this article on social media Now I’ve lived long enough to read serious articles warning, “We must consider ways to reverse, or at least slow, […]]]>

A more humane society

A deserted future


Help us expand our reach! Please share this article on social media

Now I’ve lived long enough to read serious articles warning, “We must consider ways to reverse, or at least slow, the rapid depopulation.”







Richard
villager

]]>